2023/12/03

🇯🇵 Passing Through A Major Milestone With My Very First Independent Overseas Getaway Vacation To Eastern Japan In August & September 2023 (令和5å¹´8月・9月の夏休み: 十日間東日本一周) ~ Section 1 🇯🇵

Ladies and Gentlemen, as we approach the end of another year, I hope that you will accept my apologies for the shortage of voyage trip reports for the past several months. In order to keep you updated on my overseas travels, I would like to welcome you to my maiden independent 10-day late summer getaway vacation towards eastern Japan in August & September 2023. This major overseas leisure getaway trip report will be divided into five sections, for which, this shall constitute the first section of the report itself.
 
There shall be two main focus topics, excluding the prologue, that are to be covered in this first section of the trip report. They are mainly the overnight flight to Tokyo (Haneda) and the major railroad trip to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama in Naka-ku, Yokohama. Though I cannot allow any comments to be posted for my overseas getaway videos published on YouTube for safety reasons, you may leave your comments in the main comment boxes located at the end of each trip report segment.
 
Part 1 ~ The Prologue
 
After returning from my one-week long immersion journey to Taiwan with both my mom and her friends in May 2023, I spent some time in Singapore helping my parents out with work. My mom then traveled Down Under to Perth, Western Australia, to provide some support for my younger brother for his first semester major university examinations out of concern for him developing depression if he spent too much time alone with hardly any or not one close friend. My younger brother spent a full month in Singapore prior to finally returning Down Under to Western Australia in preparation for his second semester at the end of July.
 
Barely some time after my younger brother had returned Down Under to Western Australia, I quickly decided that the time came for me to have a major 10-day overseas leisure journey on my own. Upon looking through several countries, I instantly decided upon Japan as my very first overseas leisure getaway vacation on my own. This would be a wise choice, since I knew that it would always be best to start with somewhere that you are familiar with first if you intend to learn to travel overseas independently before developing your network further.
 
Over the coming weeks, there was no doubt that I was excited to be going on my very first overseas leisure trip on my own, as it was something that I had always wanted to do ever since graduating from university in Western Australia. At the same time, I would also be lying if I mentioned that I was not nervous. Following our last one-month journey to central and western Japan in January & February 2023, my family wanted to take a break from Japan for a while to see other major world countries (i.e., Mainland China, South Korea, Europe). Therefore, it was now up to me to keep the annual Japan travels alive and running in my family.
 
However, tragedy struck my family when I lost one of my pet cats of 12 years due to old age shortly after the Singapore National Day break. As such, part of me wanting to perform this overseas journey on my own was to seek self-salvation and self-forgiveness from the chain of events leading to the recent passing of my cat due to old age, as well as to come to terms with what had happened. Even both my parents had to agree that spending some getaway time alone in Japan would help to take my mind off things.
 
On the damp morning of Tuesday (29 August), I woke up at around eleven o' clock after having a well-earned good night's rest. Having a hot shower and changing into my usual clothes, I went to prepare the rest of my baggage in preparation for the coming trip. My parents had offered to take me directly to Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 at 6.30 p.m. later that evening, with all my baggage arranged in the living area by 5.30 p.m. later on. A 6.30 p.m. departure from home would thus make sense as we would have to factor in the evening rush hours.
 
For the coming in-bound overnight flight from Singapore to Tokyo (Haneda), I would travel non-stop with All Nippon Airways on flight NH 844 bound for Tokyo (Haneda), which would be expected to depart from Singapore Changi Airport at 10.10 p.m. later that night, and then arrive at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) by 6.30 a.m. the next morning. Having arrived into Tokyo via Narita International Airport countless of times before, I knew that entering Tokyo via Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) would be a good change.
 
This would also serve as a major positive point for my very first independent overseas trip, since it would be troublesome and time-consuming to have to pass through connecting flight security checkpoints and change planes once again in another airport. Given that many developing countries have seen a drastic increase in crime rates since the outbreak of COVID-19, particularly a higher rate of violent crimes (e.g., assault, robbery), I knew that it would be safer to travel on non-stop flights to my destinations as much as possible.
 
Furthermore, for the coming accommodation, I would stay at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama located in the heart of the local Minato Mirai 21 business district of downtown Naka-ku, Yokohama. Seeing how much Airbnb places had been slowly declining and to ensure maximum security during my time in Japan, I quickly knew that I would be better off staying in a major hotel and / or a reputable serviced apartment. I was also glad that I had rented a portable Wi-Fi Internet router for use in Japan in Singapore in terms of my cellular Wi-Fi Internet connectivity, knowing how pricey it could be if I had rented an Internet router to be collected via a Japanese airport post office.
 
Later that evening, the time had come for me to depart my own home for Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 by precisely 6.25 p.m.. While my dad started up our white family car, my mom and housekeeper helped to load everything safely into the car's back trunk area. My mom even decided to follow us my dad as she had dinner plans with him later that evening too. Once all my baggage had been securely loaded into the rear trunk of our white family car, we finally departed the familiar compound of our home safely at 6.30 p.m. sharp for a rapid early evening road trip of 25 minutes over the Tampines Expressway to Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1.
 
It was not that long until we finally reached the main departures and drop-off point situated just outside Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 at 6.55 p.m. sharp. While I safely went to collect a single baggage cart, my parents helped to unload all of my baggage from the rear trunk area of our white private family car. Once all my baggage had been loaded directly onto the baggage cart, my parents wished me a pleasant 10-day getaway voyage to eastern Japan and told me to contact them daily every few hours.
 
With my parents seeing me off at the drop-off point, I safely made my way into the central departures and check-in level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 with my baggage before proceeding to the All Nippon Airways Business Class check-in counters. Once the central airline check-in counters opened by 7.10 p.m., I went over to the nearest open counter and got out both my passport and necessary travel itineraries to be directly checked by the airport check-in agent, as well as to load my bulkier check-in baggage onto the conveyor belt. The check-in process for All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 bound for Tokyo (Haneda) took not more than approximately five minutes that early evening.
 
All Nippon Airways (Japanese: 全日本空輸; Traditional Chinese: 全日本空輸; Simplified Chinese: 全日本空输; Korean: 전일본공수) is one of the two major full-service airline companies of the State of Japan. It is the largest central airline in Japan in terms of passengers carried, and has its headquarters in Shiodome City Center situated around the Shiodome district in Minato-ku, Tokyo. The airline has its two primary hubs at Narita International Airport and Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport), with two local western hub airports around Kansai International Airport and Osaka International Airport (Itami Airport), and offers just 97 revenue destinations across Asia, Europe, North America and Oceania with a large fleet comprising of both narrow-body and wide-body aircraft from Airbus and Boeing.
 
The local airline was founded from 27 December 1952 as Nippon Helicopter, and began regular overnight freighter operations between both Tokyo and Osaka from 20 January 1954, eventually attaining the current name in 1958. Progressively developing through the 1960s and 1970s, the airline company began its maiden international operations on 3 March 1986 between Tokyo and Guam and became a pure member of Star Alliance on 15 October 1999, making it the first Japanese airline company to join a global airline alliance. All Nippon Airways was also the very first airline to operate the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, beginning with a regional charter flight from Tokyo (Narita) to Hong Kong on 26 October 2011, as well as the very first Japanese carrier to attain Skytrax's five-star ratings on 29 March 2013. The company maintains several code-share agreements with most Star Alliance partners via its ANA Mileage Club frequent-flyer program.
 
The departures and drop-off point located outside Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the early evening rush hours shortly after I had arrived

Walking through the departures and drop-off point towards the entrance to the departures and check-in level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the early evening rush hours

Finally entering the departures and check-in level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the early evening rush hours

The departure flight information screens in the departures and check-in level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the early evening rush hours

Arriving at the All Nippon Airways Business Class check-in counters located in the departures and check-in level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the early evening rush hours

Waiting in line at the open All Nippon Airways Business Class check-in counters in the departures and check-in level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 to check in for All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 bound for Tokyo (Haneda)
 
Shortly after completing the major check-in process for All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 bound for Tokyo (Haneda) at the staffed All Nippon Airways Business Class check-in counters in the departure and check-in level area at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1, I securely received my boarding pass and airport lounge invitation pass at 7.15 p.m. sharp. The check-in counter agent then informed me that All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 bound for Tokyo (Haneda) would be scheduled to depart at 10.10 p.m. from Gate No. D49. Boarding would commence at 9.40 p.m. sharp, approximately half an hour before the scheduled departure time.
 
With that moment, I quickly thanked the airline check-in staff agent for all her services and went over to the departure immigration checkpoints with my carry-on belongings. To clear the departure immigration checkpoints, I promptly made use of the automated facial recognition gates reserved for both Singaporean citizens and Permanent Residents (PRs), thus permitting me to pass through the central departure immigration process in less than approximately five minutes that evening. Soon enough, I was safely in the main transit area of Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 at 7.20 p.m..
 
Given that there was plenty of good time prior to All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 bound for Tokyo (Haneda), I quickly decided to proceed to the SATS Premier Lounge for a few light refreshment snacks first. With that instant, I bypassed some duty-free retail outlet stores and took a nearby escalator up to the airport lounge mezzanine transit level area, where the SATS Premier Lounge was located. The entire major walk connecting to the SATS Premier Lounge took not more than approximately five minutes.
 
My Business Class boarding pass for the upcoming in-bound flight sector from Singapore to Tokyo (Haneda)

Walking past some airline check-in counters in the direction leading to the departure immigration checkpoints in the departures and check-in level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the early evening rush hours

Finally entering the main transit area at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the early evening rush hours

Bypassing several duty-free retail outlet stores in the main transit area at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the early evening rush hours on the way to the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level

The departure flight information screens in the main transit area at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the early evening rush hours

Approaching the escalators leading to the airline lounge mezzanine transit level in the main transit area at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the early evening rush hours

Walking through the airport lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the early evening rush hours on the way to the SATS Premier Lounge

Overlooking several duty-free retail outlet stores in the main transit area from the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the early evening rush hours on the way to the SATS Premier Lounge

Bypassing the open-air passenger rest area in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the early evening rush hours while getting closer to the SATS Premier Lounge

Crossing the main transit area footbridge while overlooking several duty-free retail outlet stores in the main transit area from the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the early evening rush hours on the way to the SATS Premier Lounge

Finally arriving at the main entrance to the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airport lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1
 
After walking through the major transit level of Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 for not more than approximately five minutes from the central departure immigration checkpoints, I safely arrived at the entrance to the SATS Premier Lounge at 7.25 p.m. sharp. Heading to the lounge reception counter, a staff receptionist then examined my red passport and boarding pass to verify my eligibility for airline lounge access. Once I was given the green light to enter, I immediately went into the central lounge area and secured a seating area for myself in the inner lounge seating area.
 
Having received ¥541,000 in total after changing several Singapore dollars the previous day, I wisely knew that it would not be necessary to perform currency exchanges in the airport terminal. This resulted in the amount of Japanese yen in my private pockets increasing from ¥225,245 to ¥766,245. Since I was feeling rather hungry, I headed to the self-service refreshment corners directly to get some pasta and chicken for myself, together with a glass of Pierre Jean Colombard Chardonnay 2022 French white wine.
 
Upon finishing my meal, I promptly decided that it was time to get some duty-free items for the upcoming trip to Japan. With that, I grabbed my belongings and departed the SATS Premier Lounge by 8.15 p.m. prior to taking the nearest escalator down to the main transit area at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1. The first central duty-free retail outlet stop I immediately made was at TWG Tea Boutique (Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 Branch), where I purchased two boxes of TWG Tea for a dear friend of mine living in Yokohama, Japan.
 
My friend came to Singapore in 2020 amidst the COVID-19 outbreak, and lived and worked in Singapore as a school teacher for three years before finally returning home to Japan to take up a job as an elementary school teacher. Upon purchasing my tea souvenirs, I stopped at The Cocoa Trees (Changi Airport Terminal 1 Transit Area West Concourse C Branch) to get some chocolates for myself and a box of pineapple tarts for my Japanese friend in Yokohama, knowing how much she would be missing the treat delights and tropical lifestyles of Singapore. I also knew that it would be good to give her something from Singapore should I meet up with her.
 
Once I had finished my required duty-free purchases, I quickly took a nearby escalator back up to the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airport lounge mezzanine transit level, eventually reaching back safely at 8.30 p.m.. Seeing that all seats inside the inner lounge seating areas were already occupied, I decided to find an empty seating spot in the main lounge area closer to the central airline lounge refreshment corners. I then helped myself to a can of Coca-cola with a glass of ice water to pass my remaining lounge time in the SATS Premier Lounge until it was time to proceed to Gate No. D49.
 
The view of the inner lounge seating areas in the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 shortly after I had entered

Bypassing the self-service refreshment corner in the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 while searching for a seating area for myself

Entering the inner lounge seating area in the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

Planning out the first section of my maiden independent overseas leisure getaway trip on my blog via my portable laptop in the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 using Frutiger LT Std as the standard font for the trip report

Reading through the most celebrated and notorious goof about Albus Dumbledore in "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" via Apple Books on my laptop in the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1, where in the novel, Dumbledore calmly asks Harry on whether he put his name in the Goblet of Fire while in the movie version, he screams like a deranged lunatic and sounds angry ("HARRY! DID YA PUT YA NAM IN DA GOBLA DEH FIYA?") to the point of physically and roughly confronting Harry on whether he put his name in the Goblet of Fire

Heading to the self-service refreshment corner in the main seating area of the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

The cold food and fruit section at the self-service refreshment corner in the main seating area of the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

The hot food section at the self-service refreshment corner in the main seating area of the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

Holding a bottle of Pierre Jean Colombard Chardonnay 2022 French white wine at the beverage section of the self-service refreshment corner in the main seating area of the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

The beverage section of the self-service refreshment counter in the main seating area of the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

A plate of assorted pasta and chicken with a glass of Pierre Jean Colombard Chardonnay 2022 French white wine for myself in the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

The inner lounge seating area in the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 shortly before I departed the lounge for some duty-free shopping

Bypassing the self-service refreshment corner in the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 as I begin to make my way down to the main transit area for some duty-free shopping

The view of the main lounge seating areas in the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 as I begin to make my way down to the main transit area for some duty-free shopping

The main entrance to the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 as I begin to make my way down to the main transit area for some duty-free shopping

Bypassing the open-air passenger rest area in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 on the way down to the main transit area for some duty-free shopping

Approaching the escalators leading down to the main transit area from the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 on the way for some duty-free shopping

Bypassing several duty-free retail outlet stores in the main transit area at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the evening rush hours while searching for a good duty-free store to purchase some duty-free items

Stopping at TWG Tea Boutique (Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 Branch) to purchase some TWG duty-free tea products in the main transit area at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

Stopping at The Cocoa Trees (Changi Airport Terminal 1 Transit Area West Concourse C Branch) to purchase some duty-free confectionery products in the main transit area at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

Walking through the main transit area in the direction leading to Concourse D on the way back to the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the evening rush hours

Bypassing TWG Tea Boutique (Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 Branch) in the main transit area at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the evening rush hours on the way back to the SATS Premier Lounge

Bypassing several duty-free retail outlet stores in the main transit area at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the evening rush hours on the way back to the SATS Premier Lounge

Taking the escalators back up to the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the evening rush hours on the way back to the SATS Premier Lounge

Bypassing the open-air passenger rest area in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the evening rush hours on the way back to the SATS Premier Lounge

Overlooking several duty-free retail outlet stores in the main transit area from the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the evening rush hours on the way back to the SATS Premier Lounge

Finally arriving back at the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the evening rush hours

Searching for a vacant seating spot in the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the evening rush hours

A can of Coca-cola with a glass of ice water for myself in the SATS Premier Check-in Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

About to enjoy my Coca-cola with ice in the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

The view of the main lounge seating areas in the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 shortly before I departed the lounge for Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D
 
Part 2(a) ~ The Flight To Tokyo (Haneda)
 
Airline: All Nippon Airways
Flight No.: NH 844
From: Singapore Changi Airport (SIN / WSSS), Changi, Singapore
To: Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) (HND / RJTT), Tokyo, Japan
Aircraft: Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner
Registration No.: JA899A (Painted in Star Alliance special livery)
Class: Business Class
Seat No.: 7H
Date: Tuesday, 29 August 2023
 
After spending approximately 1 hour 40 minutes of having a few treats and using my own electronic gadgets in the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit area at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1, the local lounge clock was safely showing 9.05 p.m. sharp. Given the fact that general boarding time for All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 bound for Tokyo (Haneda) would commence in only 35 minutes, I promptly packed all my baggage and departed from the SATS Premier Lounge for Gate No. D49 situated in Concourse D. The entire major walk connecting over to Gate No. D49 took not more than approximately 10 minutes that night.
 
Soon enough, I arrived at the front main entrance to the passenger waiting lounges at Gates No. D38, D48 and D49 at exactly 9.15 p.m., which was just in time for boarding for All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 bound for Tokyo (Haneda) to commence in 25 minutes. With just a simple and rapid security check, I was finally in the major passenger holding area at Gate No. D49 at precisely 9.20 p.m.. Observing the number of passengers at Gate No. D49, I could tell that All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 bound for Tokyo (Haneda) would be almost filled to the brim tonight.
 
As for tonight, All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 bound for Tokyo (Haneda) would be operated by a Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner plane, registered JA899A and powered with only two Rolls-Royce Trent 1000-J3 aircraft engines, also painted in the Star Alliance special livery. JA899A was delivered new to All Nippon Airways from 1 October 2018 as the 30th Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner aircraft and as the 66th Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft for the local airline company. The overall aircraft delivery would thus make the aircraft have a regular passenger service age of approximately 4.9 years old today.
 
One final view of the main seating areas in the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 as I begin to make my way to Gate No. D49 in Concourse D

The main entrance to the SATS Premier Lounge located in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 as I begin to make my way to Gate No. D49 in Concourse D

About to walk past the open-air passenger rest area in the airline lounge mezzanine transit level at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 as I begin to make my way to Gate No. D49 in Concourse D

About to take the escalator down to the main transit area of Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 from the airline lounge mezzanine transit level as I begin to make my way to Gate No. D49 in Concourse D

Bypassing several duty-free retail outlet stores in the main transit area at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the late night rush hours on the way to Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D

Overlooking the main airport tarmac from the main transit area at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 on the way to Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D

A Japan Airlines Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner, registered JA872J, being serviced at Gate No. C13 located in Concourse C at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 in preparation for her coming overnight return flight over the South China Sea and East China Sea back to the State of Japan as Japan Airlines flight JL 036 bound for Tokyo (Haneda)

An Air France Boeing 777-328/ER, registered F-GSQK, being serviced at Gate No. C15 located in Concourse C at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 in preparation for her coming long overnight return flight over the Indian Ocean back to France as Air France flight AF 257 bound for Paris (Charles de Gaulle)

Bypassing Charles & Keith (Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 Branch) in the main transit area at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 on the way to Gate No. D49 in Concourse D

Bypassing some duty-free retail outlet stores located in the main transit area near Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 on the way to Gate No. D49

Bypassing Starbucks Coffee (Changi Airport Terminal 1 Transit Lounge East Branch) on the way to Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the late night rush hours

Walking through the automated passageways in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 on the way to Gate No. D49 during the late night rush hours

Bypassing Gates No. D32 and D44 on the way to Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the late night rush hours

Bypassing Gates No. D35 and D46 on the way to Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the late night rush hours

Bypassing Gate No. D36 on the way to Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the late night rush hours

Bypassing Gates No. D37 and D47 while getting closer to Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

Finally arriving at the main entrance to Gates No. D38, D48 and D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

Finally inside the main passenger waiting areas located at Gates No. D38, D48 and D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

My aircraft for tonight, JA899A and painted in the "Star Alliance" special livery, being serviced at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 in preparation for her upcoming long overnight return flight over both the South China Sea and East China Sea back to the State of Japan as All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 bound for Tokyo (Haneda)

A closer view of JA899A being serviced at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 in preparation for her upcoming long overnight return flight over both the South China Sea and East China Sea back to the State of Japan as All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 bound for Tokyo (Haneda)

The passenger waiting lounge at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport during the late night rush hours

The overall view of the passenger waiting lounges at Gates No. D38, D48 and D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 during the late night rush hours

The departure flight information screens in the passenger waiting lounge at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 detailing important information for All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 bound for Tokyo (Haneda)

One additional view of JA899A being serviced at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 in preparation for her upcoming long overnight return flight over both the South China Sea and East China Sea back to the State of Japan as All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 bound for Tokyo (Haneda)

Overlooking the main airport tarmac from the passenger waiting lounge at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 at night

The passenger waiting lounge at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 shortly before the first boarding announcements for All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 bound for Tokyo (Haneda) were made
 
After spending approximately 25 minutes of anticipated waiting around the area near Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1, the first major boarding announcements for All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 bound for Tokyo (Haneda) were finally made by precisely 9.45 p.m. sharp, approximately five minutes behind schedule. All of the Business Class passengers, including the ANA Mileage Club members and passengers needing special assistance, were called out to board the aircraft first. Given the fact that I was among the first passengers to be directly summoned for regular boarding, I soon got out my local passport and boarding pass to be checked by the boarding gate staff on duty.
 
Walking through the major jet bridge of Gate No. D49 to Door A, I was on board JA899A at 9.50 p.m. sharp, which was in ample time for a 10.10 p.m. departure bound for Tokyo (Haneda). At the front major aircraft entrance door, a flight attendant welcomed me on board and then pointed out the direction to my seat situated in the front Business Class cabin. Stowing my baggage into their respective storage areas, I immediately settled into my assigned Seat No. 7H in preparation for the long main overnight flight of only 7 hours 20 minutes across the South China Sea and East China Sea to Tokyo (Haneda).
 
One of the flight cabin attendants, named Sabrina Murai, came over to my seat to introduce herself personally. Providing me with the in-flight dining menu, Sabrina then informed me that there was a bottle of mineral water readily provided for every individual Business Class passenger and that her fellow cabin attendants would be glad to attend to me at any time during the course of the flight. As I patiently waited for the aircraft to be pushed back from Gate No. D49 in Concourse D, I quickly sat back to update some trip report work on my personal laptop.
 
A clearer view of JA899A while passing through the jet bridge of Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

A view of my seat, 7H, during the boarding process at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat during the boarding process at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

Overlooking the main airport tarmac during the boarding process at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

A bottle of mineral water readily provided at my seat during the boarding process at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

The cover page for the in-flight dining menu for the in-bound flight sector between Singapore and Tokyo (Haneda) during the boarding process at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

Reviewing the wine and champagne sections of the in-flight dining menu for the in-bound flight sector between Singapore and Tokyo (Haneda) during the boarding process at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

Reviewing the alcoholic beverage and regular beverage sections of the in-flight dining menu for the in-bound flight sector between Singapore and Tokyo (Haneda) during the boarding process at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

Reviewing the main dining sections of the in-flight dining menu for the in-bound flight sector between Singapore and Tokyo (Haneda) during the boarding process at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

Continuing with my planning for the first section of my maiden independent overseas leisure getaway trip on my blog via my portable laptop during the boarding process at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 using Frutiger LT Std as the standard font for the trip report

Reading through the most celebrated and notorious goof about Albus Dumbledore in "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" via Apple Books on my laptop during the boarding process at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1, where in the novel, Dumbledore calmly asks Harry on whether he put his name in the Goblet of Fire while in the movie version, he screams like a deranged lunatic and sounds angry ("HARRY! DID YA PUT YA NAM IN DA GOBLA DEH FIYA?") to the point of physically and roughly confronting Harry on whether he put his name in the Goblet of Fire

The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat shortly before the boarding process at Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 was completed

Awaiting departure from Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1
 
After the on-board clock safely struck 10.10 p.m. sharp, all the two aircraft doors were closed, and the aircraft safely pushed away from Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1, which was just as scheduled. Once the in-flight aircraft safety briefing demonstration video was directly shown on my front in-flight entertainment video screen, the aircraft began to make its way over to its assigned runway for its long overnight flight back to Tokyo (Haneda), taxiing past the northern end of the central construction sites of the future Terminal 5 en route. The entire taxi to the assigned runway took approximately 15 minutes that night.
 
It was not that long until the aircraft reached its assigned airport runway located at the northern end of the construction sites of Terminal 5. Soon enough, the two main Rolls-Royce Trent 1000-J3 jet engines spooled into action, and the aircraft safely took off from Singapore Changi Airport at exactly 10.25 p.m. for its relatively long overnight return flight timing of approximately 6 hours 30 minutes across the two main China Seas to the modern and lively national metropolitan capital city area of the State of Japan. I then ascended into the black night sky for a long late overnight flight timing of only 6 hours 30 minutes over the main China Seas to the modern and colossal metropolitan capital region of the State of Japan.
 
Finally pushing back from Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

The in-flight aircraft safety briefing demonstration video reminding passengers that smoking on board the aircraft, including the use of electronic cigarettes and tampering with, disabling or destroying lavatory smoke detectors, is prohibited under the Civil Aeronautics Law of Japan

Taxiing along the main airport tarmac towards the assigned airport runway shortly after pushing back from Gate No. D49 located in Concourse D at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1

Overlooking the northern of the construction sites of the future Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 5 while taxiing away from Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1 towards the assigned airport runway

The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat during the taxi to the assigned airport runway at Singapore Changi Airport

Making a right turn towards the taxiway leading to the assigned airport runway located close to the northern end of the construction sites of the future Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 5

Entering the taxiway leading to the assigned airport runway located close to the northern end of the construction sites of the future Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 5

The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat as the aircraft gets closer to its assigned airport runway at Singapore Changi Airport

Taxiing around the northern end of the construction sites of the future Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 5 while getting closer to the assigned airport runway

Getting closer to the assigned airport runway located close to the northern end of the construction sites of the future Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 5

Making one final left turn towards the assigned airport runway at Singapore Changi Airport for the coming late night departure bound for Tokyo (Haneda)

All Nippon Airways Flight 844 ~ Late Night Departure From Singapore Changi Airport

Cruising over the Singapore Strait shortly after taking off from Singapore Changi Airport

The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat shortly after taking off from Singapore Changi Airport

Ascending further into the dark night sky over the Singapore Strait shortly after taking off from Singapore Changi Airport
 
Shortly after taking off from Singapore Changi Airport, the seat belt signs were safely turned off by around 10.40 p.m., which was approximately 15 minutes into the flight. While the flight crew attendants promptly sprung into action to commence the in-flight service, I went to the lavatories and got out my portable laptop for my entertainment and blogging purposes during the flight. Sabrina then came over to my seat at around 10.45 p.m. and asked me to confirm my meal orders for the flight.
 
For the main in-flight supper course, I would have the Singapore Hainanese chicken rice, together with a glass of Trapiche Medalla Red Blend Mendoza 2017 Argentine red wine. I would then have the Japanese breakfast before the early morning descent cum arrival into Tokyo (Haneda) later on. Since I was still feeling rather hungry after my light lounge meal, I also decided to have a glass of Champagne Castelnau - Cuvée Brut Réserve with an amuse-bouche appetizer dish comprising of seared marinated tuna and Edamame soybeans to commence the coming in-flight supper service.
 
Once Sabrina had taken down my coming in-flight supper orders carefully, I promptly sat back into my allocated Seat No. 7H and did some personal trip report editing on my laptop while waiting for my first in-flight supper meal course to arrive. Later on, Sabrina soon reappeared with the amuse-bouche appetizer dish at around 11.15 p.m.. She even brought out the Champagne Castelnau - Cuvée Brut Réserve and skillfully poured a glass from the bottle directly at my seat, which I appreciated as part of the Japanese hospitality.
 
Nearly five minutes later, Sabrina appeared once again with my Singapore Hainanese chicken rice at around 11.20 p.m., together with some dark soy sauce on the side. She also took the chance to directly pour my requested glass of Trapiche Medalla Red Blend Mendoza 2017 Argentine red wine. I soon took one bite of my Singapore Hainanese chicken rice, which tasted tender and at the right temperature. The Argentine red wine paired very well with the main meal, with the amuse-bouche and champagne tasting especially good, which made my in-flight supper a truly satisfying one.
 
The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat shortly after the seat belt signs had been turned off

A warning sign in the lavatory reminding passengers that smoking on board the aircraft, including the use of electronic cigarettes and tampering with, disabling or destroying lavatory smoke detectors, is prohibited under the Civil Aeronautics Law of Japan

The rear view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin during cruising altitude over the South China Sea just aft of Batam, Indonesia

A view of my seat, 7H, during cruising altitude over the South China Sea just aft of Batam, Indonesia

Cruising over the South China Sea just aft of Batam, Indonesia

The flight route indication map on my front in-flight entertainment video seat screen indicating the aircraft's cruising altitude over the South China Sea just aft of Batam, Indonesia

Continuing with my planning for the first section of maiden independent overseas leisure getaway trip on my blog via my portable laptop during cruising altitude over the South China Sea just aft of Batam, Indonesia, using Frutiger LT Std as the standard font for the trip report

Reading through the most celebrated and notorious goof about Albus Dumbledore in "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" via Apple Books on my laptop during cruising altitude over the South China Sea just aft of Batam, Indonesia, where in the novel, Dumbledore calmly asks Harry on whether he put his name in the Goblet of Fire while in the movie version, he screams like a deranged lunatic and sounds angry ("HARRY! DID YA PUT YA NAM IN DA GOBLA DEH FIYA?") to the point of physically and roughly confronting Harry on whether he put his name in the Goblet of Fire

Cruising over the South China Sea close to the Riau Islands, Indonesia

The flight route indication map on my front in-flight entertainment video seat screen indicating the aircraft's cruising altitude over the South China Sea close to the Riau Islands, Indonesia

The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat during cruising altitude over the South China Sea close to the Riau Islands, Indonesia

An amuse-bouche comprising of seared marinated tuna and Edamame soybeans as an appetizer for the in-flight late night supper service

The bottle of Champagne Castelnau - Cuvée Brut Réserve held by Sabrina before she poured a glass for me at my seat

A glass of Champagne Castelnau - Cuvée Brut Réserve to accompany my in-flight late night supper amuse-bouche appetizer course

About to enjoy my amuse-bouche appetizer course of the in-flight late night supper service with my glass of champagne

My main in-flight late night supper course: Singapore Hainanese chicken rice with dark soy sauce on the side

The bottle of Trapiche Medalla Red Blend Mendoza 2017 Argentine red wine held by Sabrina before she poured a glass for me at my seat

A glass of Trapiche Medalla Red Blend Mendoza 2017 Argentine red wine to accompany my main in-flight late night supper course

About to enjoy my main in-flight late night supper course with my glass of red wine

The view of my in-flight late night supper tray shortly after I had finished my main in-flight late night supper course
 
After spending the first 45 minutes of the flight enjoying my in-flight supper and using my laptop, the clock was finally showing 11.30 p.m.. Sabrina then came by to my table and asked whether there was anything else I wanted to conclude the in-flight late night supper service as she cleared away my used in-flight meal tray. Given that I was now in the mood for some dessert after finishing my main in-flight supper course, I promptly requested for a tub of vanilla-flavored Häagen-Dazs ice cream and a cup of hot black tea with milk to accompany it.
 
The Häagen-Dazs ice cream was enough to cool my taste buds just after the in-flight supper service, with the hot black tea with milk enough to get me warmed up for the rest of the coming night. Once Sabrina came over to my seat to clear away my used dessert cutlery, I went over to the front lavatory and converted my seat into a complete lie-flat bed of 180º, wanting to get some sleep during the course of the late night flight. Finishing off some of my personal overseas trip report work on my laptop, I soon turned in by 12 midnight for some undisturbed sleep across the South China Sea.
 
Watching the extended version of "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets" (2002) on my laptop, where in this scene, Professor Minerva McGonagall escorts Harry and Ron to the Hogwarts Hospital Wing to visit a Petrified Hermione after the cancellation of a Quidditch match between Gryffindor and Hufflepuff due to a series of attacks on Muggle-born students with the opening of the Chamber of Secrets

Cruising over the South China Sea between Sarawak and Sabah, Malaysia

The flight route indication map on my front in-flight entertainment video seat screen indicating the aircraft's cruising altitude over the South China Sea between Sabah and Sarawak, Malaysia

A tub of vanilla-flavored Häagen-Dazs ice cream and a cup of hot black tea with milk for myself to conclude the in-flight late night supper service

The rear view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin during cruising altitude over the South China Sea between Sabah, Malaysia, and Puerto Princesa, Philippines

A view of my seat, 7H, in its complete lie-flat bed position during cruising altitude over the South China Sea between Sabah, Malaysia, and Puerto Princesa, Philippines

The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat during cruising altitude over Sabah, Malaysia, and Puerto Princesa, Philippines

The flight route indication map on my front in-flight entertainment video seat screen indicating the aircraft's cruising altitude over the South China Sea between Sabah, Malaysia, and Puerto Princesa, Philippines

Cruising over the South China Sea between Sabah, Malaysia, and Puerto Princesa, Philippines, shortly before getting some sleep during the flight
 
Part 2(b) ~ The Descent Cum Arrival Into Tokyo (Haneda)
 
After getting approximately 2 hours 10 minutes of undisturbed rest across the South China Sea, I safely woke up at precisely 2.10 a.m., in accordance with the Philippine Standard Time (PhST) Zone. Since most of the Business Class passengers were still asleep, I quietly went to the nearest lavatory to freshen up in preparation for the morning descent cum arrival into Tokyo (Haneda) later on. Noticing that I was already awake, Sabrina asked me if there was anything I wanted before the in-flight breakfast service.
 
As a small snack before the in-flight breakfast service, I instantly requested for a single glass of iced green tea and a small packet of mixed nuts. With Sabrina noting down my request, I then went back to my seat and got out my laptop to do some personal surfing and some more trip report editing. Once Sabrina came with my iced tea and nuts, I promptly sipped down my tea and finished my nuts within a few minutes. Sabrina even came over to clear my used tea glass once I was finished with my snack while I patiently waited for my in-flight breakfast.
 
The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat during cruising altitude over the Philippine Sea between Tuguegarao, Philippines and Kaohsiung, Taiwan shortly after I had woken up

The warning sign in the lavatory reminding passengers that smoking on board the aircraft, including the use of electronic cigarettes and tampering with, disabling or destroying lavatory smoke detectors, is prohibited under the Civil Aeronautics Law of Japan

A view of my seat, 7H, in its lounging position during cruising altitude over the Philippine Sea between Tuguegarao, Philippines, and Kaohsiung, Taiwan

The rear view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin during cruising altitude over the Philippine Sea between Tuguegarao, Philippines, and Kaohsiung, Taiwan

The flight route indication map on my front in-flight entertainment video screen indicating the aircraft's cruising altitude over the Philippine Sea between Tuguegarao, Philippines, and Kaohsiung, Taiwan

Cruising over the Philippine Sea between Tuguegarao, Philippines, and Kaohsiung, Taiwan

A glass of iced green tea with a packet of mixed nuts as a small snack for myself before the in-flight breakfast service

The flight route indication map on my front in-flight entertainment video screen indicating the aircraft's cruising altitude over the Philippine Sea between Kaohsiung, Taiwan, and Miyakojima, Okinawa

Cruising over the Philippine Sea between Kaohsiung, Taiwan, and Miyakojima, Okinawa
 
After spending the first 50 minutes of freshening up and having some early morning tea, Sabrina finally appeared with my in-flight Japanese breakfast meal tray at three o' clock. To accompany my breakfast, I quickly requested for a glass of orange juice, which she brought out within a few minutes. In this particular case, everything was served in a single tray to accommodate the rest of my flight from Singapore over to Tokyo (Haneda), including the appetizer, main course, fresh fruits and miso soup with Japanese pickles.
 
The appetizer courses consisted of a scallop with apple cider vinegar gelée, beef and vegetable roll, smoked duck and a Japanese tamagoyaki (卵焼き) omelet, with the main meal course consisting of salt-grilled Atka mackerel and steamed white rice. Once I had tucked into my own in-flight Japanese breakfast course, I was promptly impressed by the taste and quality of the local Japanese meal. Everything tasted delicious, with the salt-grilled Atka mackerel and steamed white rice serving as the meal's highlight dish. This Japanese in-flight breakfast meal would thus be one of the best on-board breakfast meals I have ever eaten on an airplane.
 
By 3.20 a.m., most of the passengers were gradually beginning to wake up for breakfast after getting some rest. Once I was finished with my in-flight Japanese breakfast, Sabrina came by to clear my used meal tray and asked whether there was anything else I wanted for this flight voyage. Knowing that I would have to keep myself hydrated, I requested for another cup of hot black tea with milk and a small bottle of water. Taking down my drink orders, she returned to my seat with them within just a few minutes.
 
Sipping down my cup of tea, I settled back to do some trip report editing on my laptop while most of the other passengers had their breakfast. Once my used tea cup was cleared, I went to the nearby lavatory and packed some of my belongings in preparation for the coming descent and arrival into Tokyo (Haneda). With the sun rising over the Philippine Sea at around 4.10 a.m., I spent the rest of the flight voyage observing the sunrise over the Philippine Sea and the airspace of Japan while surfing my portable laptop.
 
My in-flight Japanese breakfast meal course and my glass of orange juice presented to me on my dining table during the in-flight breakfast service

About to enjoy my in-flight Japanese breakfast meal course during cruising altitude over the Philippine Sea between Kaohsiung, Taiwan, and Miyakojima, Okinawa

My in-flight Japanese breakfast meal tray on my dining table shortly after I had finished my meal over the Philippine Sea just aft of Naha, Okinawa

The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat during cruising altitude over the Philippine Sea just aft of Naha, Okinawa

An additional cup of hot black tea with milk and a bottle of mineral water for myself during cruising altitude over the Philippine Sea just aft of Naha, Okinawa

The flight route indication map on my front in-flight entertainment video screen indicating the aircraft's cruising altitude over the Philippine Sea just aft of Naha, Okinawa

Cruising over the Philippine Sea just aft of Naha, Okinawa

The rear view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin during cruising altitude over the Philippine Sea just aft of Naha, Okinawa

A view of my seat, 7H, in its lounging position during cruising altitude over the Philippine Sea just aft of Naha, Okinawa

The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat during cruising altitude over the Philippine Sea between Naha, Okinawa, and Kagoshima

The flight route indication map on my front in-flight entertainment screen indicating the aircraft's cruising altitude over the Philippine Sea between Naha, Okinawa, and Kagoshima

Cruising over the Philippine Sea between Naha, Okinawa, and Kagoshima as daylight begins to break

The flight route indication map on my front in-flight entertainment video screen indicating the aircraft's cruising altitude over the Philippine Sea between Miyazaki and Kochi

The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat during cruising altitude over the Philippine Sea between Miyazaki and Kochi

Cruising through a blanket of clouds over the Philippine Sea between Miyazaki and Kochi as daylight gradually continues to break

The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat during cruising altitude over the Kii Peninsula near Shingu, Wakayama

The flight route indication map on my front in-flight entertainment video screen indicating the aircraft's cruising altitude over the Kii Peninsula near Shingu, Wakayama

Cruising over a blanket of clouds above the Kii Peninsula near Shingu, Wakayama, as the first orange signs of sunrise begin to show

The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat during cruising altitude over the Kii Peninsula between Shingu, Wakayama, and Hamamatsu, Shizuoka

The flight route indication map on my front in-flight entertainment video screen indicating the aircraft's cruising altitude over the Kii Peninsula between Shingu, Wakayama, and Hamamatsu, Shizuoka

Cruising over a blanket of clouds above the Kii Peninsula between Shingu, Wakayama, and Hamamatsu, Shizuoka, shortly after the sun had risen above the horizon

The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat during cruising altitude between the Kii Peninsula and Izu Peninsula

The flight route indication map on my front in-flight entertainment video screen indicating the aircraft's cruising altitude between the Kii Peninsula and Izu Peninsula

Cruising over some clouds above the Kii Peninsula and Izu Peninsula shortly after the sun had risen above the horizon

The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat during cruising altitude over the Izu Peninsula between Shimoda, Shizuoka, and Miura, Kanagawa

The flight route indication map on my front in-flight entertainment video screen indicating the aircraft's cruising altitude over the Izu Peninsula between Shimoda, Shizuoka, and Miura, Kanagawa

Cruising over the Izu Peninsula between Shimoda, Shizuoka, and Miura, Kanagawa
 
In accordance with the Japan Standard Time (JST), the seat belt signs were illuminated by 5.35 a.m., approximately 20 minutes in preparation for the coming morning descent and arrival into Tokyo (Haneda). Since there was less than half an hour left before the morning arrival into Tokyo (Haneda) later on, I placed my belongings into their storage areas and fastened my seat belt before the Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner aircraft could commence its approach into its final destination. The in-flight attendants went through the aircraft cabin conducting their final safety checks at the same time.
 
The morning sun was shining brightly across the waters of Tokyo Bay as the aircraft began to make the final approach into Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport). After a long main overnight flight of 6 hours 30 minutes over both the South China Sea and East China Sea from the humid tropical island city-state of the Republic of Singapore located around the major sea waters of the Johor Straits, I safely touched down into Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) by 5.55 a.m., approximately 35 minutes ahead of schedule. The Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft then made its way across the central tarmac to its allocated gate situated at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3.
 
Tokyo International Airport (Japanese: 東京国際空港; Traditional Chinese: 東京國際機場; Korean: 도쿄 국제공항), also known as Haneda Airport (Japanese: 羽田空港; Traditional Chinese: 羽田機場; Korean: 하네다 공항), is a large major international airport complex located near Tokyo Bay around the suburban outskirts of Ota-ku, Tokyo, Japan. It is one of the two international airports serving the Greater Tokyo Area, the world's fourth-busiest airport complex, the third-busiest airport in Asia and the busiest airport in Japan, with more than 87.1 million passengers passing through the major airport complex by 2018. The airport itself serves as a main hub for Air Do, All Nippon Airways, Japan Airlines, Skymark Airlines, Solaseed Air and StarFlyer, including as an integral focus city for Delta Air Lines and Singapore Airlines.
 
The airport was safely opened for service on 25 August 1931, becoming the gateway for customers entering Tokyo for several years. However, after the opening of Narita International Airport from 20 May 1978, Haneda Airport catered to domestic flights while Narita International Airport catered to all major international flights to and from the large Greater Tokyo Area. From 29 November 2003, Haneda Airport began to cater to limited international services for Mainland China, Hong Kong and South Korea, with a relatively small and isolated International Terminal building. An additional domestic passenger terminal, Terminal 2, was also opened from 1 December 2004 to cater to increased domestic passenger traffic at the airport.
 
From 21 October 2010, a larger International Terminal complex was officially opened for service, allowing Haneda Airport to cater to international flights during the early morning and late midnight hours after Narita International Airport has ended its business operations for the day. However, this resulted in major complaints due to most facilities and enterprises being closed after midnight hours. To rectify these complaints, a new boarding gate concourse was opened from 30 March 2014, allowing Haneda Airport to cater to more international flights during the daylight hours. A four-star hotel connecting to the main International Terminal building, known as The Royal Park Hotel Tokyo Haneda, was also opened for service on 30 September 2014.
 
From 14 March 2020, the International Terminal was eventually renamed as Terminal 3 as Terminal 2 began to cater to some international flights by All Nippon Airways on 29 March 2020. However, the major international flight section of Terminal 2 was closed from 11 April 2020 due to the outbreak of COVID-19, eventually reopening on 19 July 2023. From 31 January 2023, an airport multi-purpose complex close to Terminal 3, Haneda Airport Garden (Japanese: 羽田エアポートガーデン; Traditional Chinese: 羽田機場花園), was opened, also housing two main Villa Fontaine hotels, 20 restaurant outlets and at least 60 retail outlet stores.
 
The airport is safely accessible from the Hamamatsucho district in Minato-ku, Tokyo, via the Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line, with the premium non-stop Haneda Express services taking approximately 20 minutes. There are no extra charges necessary for the Tokyo Monorail for foreigners traveling with a Japan Rail Pass, with a JR East Travel Service Center situated on the second level at Terminal 3. The Keihin Kyuko Line provides through train services to Shinagawa, with certain railway services going as far as Narita International Airport via the Toei Asakusa Line, Keisei Main Line and Keisei Narita Airport Line (Narita Sky Access Line).
 
The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat shortly after the seat belt signs were illuminated in preparation for the early morning descent cum arrival into Tokyo (Haneda)

The flight route indication map on my front in-flight entertainment video screen indicating the aircraft's cruising altitude over Tokyo Bay close to Kimitsu, Chiba

Cruising over the waters of Tokyo Bay close to Kimitsu, Chiba, shortly before the aircraft began to make its early morning descent cum arrival into Tokyo (Haneda)

The flight route indication map on my front in-flight entertainment video screen indicating the aircraft's cruising altitude over Tokyo Bay near Kisarazu, Chiba

Cruising over the waters of Tokyo Bay near Kisarazu, Chiba, as the aircraft begins to make its final approach into Tokyo (Haneda)

The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Business Class cabin from my seat as the aircraft begins to make its final approach into Tokyo (Haneda)

Cruising over the waters of Tokyo Bay near Sodegaura, Chiba, as the aircraft begins to make its final approach into Tokyo (Haneda)

Cruising over several industrial areas in Ichihara, Chiba, over the waters of Tokyo Bay as the aircraft begins to make its final approach into Tokyo (Haneda)

All Nippon Airways Flight 844 ~ Early Morning Arrival Into Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport)

Taxiing past several parked Japanese aircraft along the main airport tarmac near Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2 shortly after landing

An All Nippon Airways Boeing 777-381/ER, registered JA784A and painted in the "Pokémon Eevee Jet" special livery, undergoing final maintenance inspections at one of the aircraft maintenance hangars before her debut flight the next day

Taxiing past the aircraft maintenance hangars located south of the three airport passenger terminal buildings at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) on a bright and clear late summer's early morning

A Japan Airlines Boeing 777-346/ER, registered JA735J, resting outside one of the aircraft maintenance hangars at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) on a bright and clear late summer's early morning

Overlooking the International Flight Area at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2 as the aircraft continues to make its way across the main airport tarmac to Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 on a bright and clear late summer's early morning

Making a straight taxi near one of the main airport runways along the airport tarmac towards Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 on a bright and clear late summer's early morning

Overlooking Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 1 as the aircraft continues to make its way across the main airport tarmac to Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 on a bright and clear late summer's early morning

A Cathay Pacific Airbus A350-941, registered B-LRO, resting on the main airport tarmac near Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3. She will then be towed to Gate No. 144 located in Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 in preparation for her regional morning return flight over the East China Sea back to the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) as Cathay Pacific flight CX 543 bound for Hong Kong

A Japan Airlines Airbus A350-941, registered JA15XJ and painted in the "Oneworld" special livery, being serviced at Gate No. 7 located in the South Wing of Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 1 in preparation for her coming regional early morning domestic flight down to Okinawa as Japan Airlines flight JL 903 bound for Okinawa (Naha)

Getting an overall view of Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 1 as the aircraft continued to make its way across the main airport tarmac to Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 on a bright and clear late summer's early morning

A Japan Airlines Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner, registered JA882J, being towed to Gate No. 105 located in Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 in preparation for her coming regional early morning flight over the Sea of Japan and Yellow Sea to the People's Republic of China (Mainland China) as Japan Airlines flight JL 021 bound for Beijing (Capital)

Making a left turn along the main airport tarmac to Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 on a bright and clear late summer's early morning

Taxiing past some remote aircraft stands as the aircraft gets closer to Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 on a bright and clear late summer's early morning

A Japan Airlines Boeing 777-346/ER, registered JA741J, resting at Gate No. 114 located in Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 after arriving from her long overnight return flight over the North Pacific Ocean from the United States as Japan Airlines flight JL 003 from New York (John F. Kennedy). She will then have another long early morning flight over the North Pacific Ocean and Arctic Ocean to France as Japan Airlines flight JL 045 bound for Paris (Charles de Gaulle)

A Japan Airlines Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner, registered JA872J, resting at Gate No. 113 located in Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 after arriving from her long overnight return flight over the South China Sea and East China Sea from the Republic of Singapore as Japan Airlines flight JL 036 from Singapore

An All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner, registered JA879A, resting at Gate No. 111 located in Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 after arriving from her long overnight return flight over the South China Sea and East China Sea from the Kingdom of Thailand as All Nippon Airways flight NH 850 from Bangkok (Suvarnabhumi)

Finally arriving at my assigned arrival gate, Gate No. 110, located in Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3

The view of the All Nippon Airways Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner Business Class cabin from my seat shortly after arriving at my assigned arrival gate, Gate No. 110, located in Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3
 
After taxiing across the airport tarmac for not more than approximately 10 minutes to Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3, I soon arrived at my assigned arrival gate, Gate No. 110, at 6.05 a.m.. Once all the seat belt signs had been turned off, I instantly unbuckled my seat belt and retrieved all of my belongings from their stowage spaces before the major disembarkation process at Gate No. 110 could commence. I also conducted one final spot check around my own seat to ensure that nothing had been left behind on board the aircraft cabin.
 
The flight cabin attendants armed the main aircraft doors open carefully to allow the passengers to disembark at Gate No. 110. As I safely disembarked from JA899A through the nearest aircraft exit door with all my belongings, all the flight cabin crew attendants thanked me for choosing to travel with All Nippon Airways and wished me a fun-filled 10-day long summer season getaway vacation in eastern Japan. I soon passed through the jet bridge of Gate No. 110 into Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3.
 
After flying with an airline on any particular flight sector, I give the airline an overall holistic airline score report to determine whether that airline is worth flying with for that major flight sector. If that flight has a rapid stopover at a different airport before its final destination, the airline shall receive the final score report at the end of the second flight journey section. For example, if I am flying on Singapore Airlines flight SQ 012 from Singapore to Los Angeles via Tokyo (Narita), the airline will receive the final score report at the end of the second flight sector from Tokyo (Narita) to Los Angeles.
 
There are five components that constitute an overall airline score report, which consist of the seating, in-flight catering, in-flight service, legroom space and aircraft cleanliness. With each component weighing 20 points (thereby implying 20% of the final scores each), the overall airline score report has a maximum of 100 points. An airline company must attain an overall airline score of 50 points or higher out of 100 points to receive a passing grade following any flight sector, whether it is a one-stop flight service or a non-stop flight service.
 
The top two grades, 'Outstanding' and 'Exceeds Expectations', are quality passes, while 'Acceptable' is a borderline pass. 'Fair' and 'Poor' are below passes, with the lowest grade being 'Dreadful', thereby meaning that the airline has failed to satisfy the prerequisite for the minimum grade. With increasing competition levels between global airlines, this airline grading system is updated every three to four years, though in view of the global outbreak of COVID-19, there will be delays in implementing a newer and more up-to-date aggregate scoring system until at least 2026 or 2027.
 
As of 1 July 2023, the airline grading system for my overseas travels is as follows:
 
Outstanding: 80% or above (Airline has an excellent rating and performance)
Exceeds Expectations: 65% ~ 79% (Airline has a good rating and performance)
Acceptable: 50% ~ 64% (Airline has an adequate rating and performance)
Fair: 35% ~ 49% (Airline has a fair rating and performance)
Poor: 20% ~ 34% (Airline has a poor rating and performance)
Dreadful: Below 20% (Airline has failed to meet the prerequisite for the minimum grade)
 
All Nippon Airways Flight 844 Score Report
 
Seating: 18 / 20
In-flight Catering: 18 / 20
In-flight Service: 17 / 20
Aircraft Cleanliness: 16 / 20
Legroom Space: 17 / 20
Total: 86 / 100
Grade: Outstanding
 
On analyzing the five individual score components, All Nippon Airways has obtained an aggregate score of 86% for the long in-bound flight segment from Singapore to Tokyo (Haneda), thus implying that the airline company has successfully obtained the highest grade of 'Outstanding'. All the flight attendants were professional in delivering their services and approachable, with the in-flight catering also outstanding. It is indeed remarkable for All Nippon Airways to obtain such a high airline score result, especially since I had not flown with them internationally for many years since my very first major overseas getaway trip to Japan in September 2001. Overall, this was indeed an excellent flight. A job very well done, All Nippon Airways!
 
Part 3 ~ The Journey To The Oakwood Suites Yokohama
 
After disembarking from All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 from Singapore with my belongings at Gate No. 110, I passed through the airport terminal passageway leading to the post-arrival immigration checkpoints located in Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3. The entire major terminal passageway from Gate No. 110 to the central arrival immigration checkpoints lasted approximately five minutes. Reaching the major arrival immigration checkpoints at 6.15 a.m., I went to the foreign visitors' sector and got out my passport and required travel documents to be thoroughly checked by the immigration staff. With the crowds of travelers waiting to enter Japan, the main post-arrival immigration procedures took not more than approximately 10 minutes that morning.
 
Upon clearing the arrival immigration checkpoints at precisely 6.25 a.m., I promptly went to check which baggage carousel belt my bulkier check-in baggage would securely arrive at. According to the baggage information display screens, all my bulkier check-in baggage from All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 from Singapore would arrive at Belt F. With that moment, I went over to claim a baggage cart for myself before heading to Belt F to collect my check-in baggage from All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 from Singapore. Once I had collected all my baggage from Belt F, I had to pass through a Japanese customs checkpoint area to make sure that I was not carrying any prohibited or controlled items into Japan.
 
Walking through the jet bridge of Gate No. 110 in the direction leading to the arrival immigration checkpoints located in Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 shortly after disembarking from All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 from Singapore

One final view of JA899A resting at Gate No. 110 located in Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 after arriving from her long overnight return flight over both the South China Sea and East China Sea from the Republic of Singapore as All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 from Singapore

Walking through the automated passageway leading to the arrival immigration checkpoints located in Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 during the bright and clear wee hours of the early morning
 
After collecting my bulkier check-in baggage from All Nippon Airways flight NH 844 from Singapore at Belt F and securely passing through a post-arrival custom security check, I was finally in the central arrivals and meeting lobby level of Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 at 6.35 a.m. sharp. Given that I was feeling relatively thirsty after safely passing through immigration and collecting my bulky check-in baggage, I quickly decided to search for a nearby airport cafeteria to have some morning tea first prior to doing anything else.
 
With that instant, I immediately walked through the major post-arrivals and meeting level of Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 in search of a cafeteria for some early morning tea while pushing my baggage cart. Soon enough, I finally arrived at a well-known cafeteria outlet, known as Tully's Coffee (Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Branch) (タリーズコーヒー 羽田空港第3ターミナル店), securely by exactly 6.55 a.m. sharp. Knowing that the seating areas were rather crowded at this time, I knew that I would have to leave my baggage cart outside the seating areas of the cafeteria.
 
Proceeding to the main customer counter, I immediately purchased a single cup of Japanese royal milk tea without sugar for myself, knowing well that such tea would be an essential beverage for me once I had landed in Japan. Upon receiving my royal milk tea, I found a nearby seating area and slowly sipped on my morning milk tea while doing some personal overseas report editing on my laptop. To protect myself against COVID-19, I wisely kept my mask on at all times despite the relaxation of mask-wearing requirements.
 
Finally inside the main arrivals and meeting lobby located on the second level at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 during the early morning rush hours

Overlooking the airport limousine bus ticketing counters and car rental counters in the main arrivals and meeting lobby located on the second level at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 during the early morning rush hours

Bypassing the Tourist Information Center located in the main arrivals and meeting lobby located on the second level at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 during the early morning rush hours

Walking through the main arrivals and meeting lobby located on the second level at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 in search of a nearby cafeteria for some light early morning tea during the early morning rush hours

Finally arriving at Tully's Coffee (Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Branch) (タリーズコーヒー 羽田空港第3ターミナル店) located in the arrivals and meeting lobby on the second floor of Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 during the early morning rush hours

The view of the main seating area at Tully's Coffee (Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Branch) (タリーズコーヒー 羽田空港第3ターミナル店) located in the arrivals and meeting lobby on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 on a bright and clear late summer's early morning

A cup of Japanese royal milk tea for myself at the main seating area at Tully's Coffee (Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Branch) (タリーズコーヒー 羽田空港第3ターミナル店) located in the arrivals and meeting lobby on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 on a bright and clear late summer's early morning

Overlooking the Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line station building at Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Station from the main seating area at Tully's Coffee (Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Branch) (タリーズコーヒー 羽田空港第3ターミナル店) located in the arrivals and meeting lobby on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 on a bright and clear late summer's early morning

The view of the main seating area at Tully's Coffee (Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Branch) (タリーズコーヒー 羽田空港第3ターミナル店) located in the arrivals and meeting lobby on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 shortly before I departed the cafeteria to run more post-arrival errands
 
After having some light early morning tea and doing some overseas getaway trip report editing on my laptop at Tully's Coffee (Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Branch) (タリーズコーヒー 羽田空港第3ターミナル店), the passenger terminal clock was now showing 7.35 a.m.. Given that I was in need of a shower after my flight from Singapore earlier on, I promptly collected my belongings and walked through the arrivals and meeting level in search for a nearby airport shower lounge. Soon enough, I safely arrived at the entrance to The Shower Room located on the second floor at 7.40 a.m..
 
Heading to the shower lounge reception counter, a shower staff receptionist informed me that showers would be free of charge for all arriving First Class and Business Class passengers. Upon securely showing both my passport and airline boarding pass, I was soon given my airport shower room key and saw that I would be assigned to Room W for my coming shower. Due to capacity constraints around the shower room cubicle areas, I knew that I would have to leave my baggage cart by the main shower reception counter.
 
With that, I then thanked the shower staff receptionist and took my airport shower room key prior to proceeding to my allocated shower Room W with my lighter haversack. Inserting the key into the lock of Room W, I promptly turned on the light and saw that there was a main shower cubicle with the necessary liquid soaps, a hairdryer, several towels and a vanity mirror. Once the door was locked, I went to have a well-deserved shower in The Shower Room at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3.
 
The exterior view of Tully's Coffee (Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Branch) (タリーズコーヒー 羽田空港第3ターミナル店) located in the arrivals and meeting lobby on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 as I begin my search for a nearby post-arrival shower lounge

Walking through the arrivals and meeting lobby located on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 in search of a post-arrival shower lounge during the early morning rush hours

Approaching the northern end of the arrivals and meeting lobby located on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 during the early morning rush hours

Finally arriving at the main entrance to The Shower Room located in the arrivals and meeting lobby on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 during the early morning rush hours

Walking through the passageway in The Shower Room located in the arrivals and meeting lobby on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 in the direction leading to my assigned shower Room W

Finally arriving at my assigned shower Room W in the The Shower Room located in the arrivals and meeting lobby on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3

The interior of my assigned shower Room W in The Shower Room located in the arrivals and meeting lobby on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 shortly after I had entered

A pair of Type A and Type B AC power outlets in my assigned shower Room W in The Shower Room located in the arrivals and meeting lobby on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3

One additional view of my assigned shower Room W in The Shower Room located in the arrivals and meeting lobby on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 shortly after I had finished my post-arrival airport shower
 
After having a very well-earned and refreshing shower in The Shower Room situated in the post-arrivals and meeting lobby on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3, the local clock was safely showing 8.05 a.m.. Checking to ensure that there was nothing left behind, I turned off all the lights and locked my assigned Room W before heading to the main shower reception counter to return my assigned shower room key, as well as to collect my bulkier check-in baggage cart. Since I would have to make some reservations during the stay in Japan, I safely knew that I would have to purchase a Japanese cell phone SIM card for my personal use.
 
Loading my belongings onto the large baggage cart, I departed The Shower Room at 8.10 a.m. and walked across the post-arrivals and meeting lobby in search of a cellular SIM card retail store. Soon enough, I arrived at a cellular Wi-Fi router and SIM card store closer to Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Station, known as Global Wi-Fi & Ninja Wi-Fi (Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Branch) (グローバルWi-Fi・NINJA Wi-Fi 羽田空港第3ターミナル店), at precisely 8.15 a.m. sharp. Proceeding to the major reception counter, I informed a receptionist that I had plans to get a local Japanese cell phone SIM card for my own use in Japan.
 
The staff receptionist then recommended me a one-month plan that would allow me to make local phone calls in Japan. Each phone call would last up to five minutes for every session, with extra surcharges to be applied to my VISA credit card should any one session exceed the time limit. My Japanese phone number would then expire on Saturday (30 September), though my return date back to Singapore would be on Friday (8 September). Without anymore hesitation, I heartily agreed and showed my passport to the staff receptionist prior to making the necessary payments for my local Japanese cell phone SIM card and inserting it into the spare cell phone.
 
Upon securing my local Japanese cell phone SIM card, I thanked the Global Wi-Fi & Ninja Wi-Fi receptionist and soon made my way to Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Station to exchange my Japan Rail Pass Exchange Voucher for a one-week Green-type Japan Rail Pass. Passing through the Tokyo Monorail concourse, I safely reached the JR East Travel Service Center at exactly 8.45 a.m.. Placing my cart outside the entrance, I went to the nearest exchange counter, where I showed both my passport and Green-type Japan Rail Pass Exchange Voucher to a local staff receptionist on duty. The Japan Rail Pass exchange process lasted approximately five minutes that early morning.
 
Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Station (Japanese: 羽田空港第3ターミナル駅; Thai: สถานี สนามบินฮาเนดะ อาคาร 3; Chinese: 羽田機場第3航站樓站) is an airport rail link station complex located in Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) by 6-5 Haneda-kuko 2-chome, Ota-ku, Tokyo, Japan. It is securely connected over to the main passenger terminal building at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3, with the Keikyu Line station platforms located below the core passenger terminal building and the Tokyo Monorail station platforms linked with the departures and check-in area located on the third floor. All trains to and from the airport make stop here, with certain Keikyu Line railway services operating as far as Narita International Airport located in Chiba Prefecture via the Toei Asakusa Line and the Narita Sky Access Line.
 
The station was opened on 21 October 2010 in conjunction with the opening of the current International Terminal at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport), with its station name written as 羽田空港国際線ビル駅 for the Tokyo Monorail line and as 羽田空港国際線ターミナル駅 for the Keikyu Airport Line. The major railway lines had mutual English names known as Haneda Airport International Terminal Station. A JR East Travel Service Center is situated just below the Tokyo Monorail platforms in the main arrival and meeting hall on the second floor, with its business hours from 6.45 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. daily.
 
From the start of the revised timetable on 14 March 2020, with the renaming of the current International Terminal to Terminal 3, the entire railway station complex was finally renamed to its current name as Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Station. As of 18 March 2023, the railway station complex has two elevated side platforms catering to two tracks for the Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line, and two underground side platforms serving just two railway tracks for the Keikyu Airport Line.
 
The main entrance to The Shower Room located in the arrivals and meeting lobby on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 during the early morning rush hours as I begin to make my way to Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Station

Bypassing the domestic flight connection check-in counters in the arrivals and meeting lobby located on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 during the early morning rush hours

Walking past some retail outlet stores in the arrivals and meeting lobby located on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 in the direction leading to Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Station during the early morning rush hours

Bypassing the Keikyu Airport Line ticketing concourse at Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Station during the early morning rush hours

Stopping at Global Wi-Fi & Ninja Wi-Fi (Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Branch) (グローバルWi-Fi・NINJA Wi-Fi 羽田空港第3ターミナル店) near the Keikyu Airport Line ticketing concourse at Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Station to purchase a local Japanese cell phone SIM card during the early morning rush hours

Bypassing some temporary baggage storage lockers near Global Wi-Fi & Ninja Wi-Fi (Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Branch) (グローバルWi-Fi・NINJA Wi-Fi 羽田空港第3ターミナル店) on the way to the Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line ticketing concourse at Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Station during the early morning rush hours

Approaching the Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line ticketing concourse at Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Station during the early morning rush hours

Finally arriving at the main entrance to the JR East Travel Service Center located in the Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line ticketing concourse at Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Station during the early morning rush hours
 
After completing the Japan Rail Pass application and exchange process at the JR East Travel Service Center at Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Station, I received my one-week Green-type Japan Rail Pass at exactly 8.50 a.m. sharp. The valid dates of unrestricted railroad journeys would securely last from Thursday (31 August) until Wednesday (6 September). Since I was beginning to feel rather hungry after completing my necessary post-arrival errands, I soon decided to head to Terminal 2 for some light breakfast before commencing the railroad journey to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama.
 
With that, I quickly departed the JR East Travel Service Center and went back into the arrivals and meeting lobby area before catching the closest elevator down to Entrance Plaza on the first floor, eventually reaching there safely at 8.55 a.m.. Returning the baggage cart at the airport cart pool, I grabbed my baggage and boarded the nearest arriving yellow free inter-airport terminal shuttle bus for the coming routine bus trip to Terminal 2. Once the bus door was securely closed, I finally departed Terminal 3 by nine o' clock sharp for a free inter-airport terminal shuttle bus trip of only 10 minutes to Terminal 2.
 
The Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line ticketing concourse at Haneda Airport Terminal 3 Station during the early morning rush hours as I begin to make my way to the Entrance Plaza located on the first floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3

Walking through the arrivals and meeting lobby located on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 on the way to the Entrance Plaza on the first floor during the early morning rush hours

Approaching the elevator lobby in the arrivals and meeting lobby on the second floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 on the way down to the Entrance Plaza on the first floor during the early morning rush hours

Walking through the Entrance Plaza located on the first floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 during the early morning rush hours

The free inter-airport terminal shuttle bus stand located outside the Entrance Plaza on the first floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 during the early morning rush hours

A yellow free inter-terminal airport shuttle bus arriving at the free inter-terminal airport shuttle bus stand located outside the Entrance Plaza on the first floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 during the early morning rush hours

Awaiting departure from Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 on a bright and clear late summer's morning

Finally departing from Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 on a bright and clear late summer's morning

Traveling parallel to the Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line tracks while making a left turn towards Tokyo Metropolitan Route 311 shortly after departing Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 on a bright and clear late summer's morning

Bypassing an aircraft maintenance hangar near Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 while traveling along Tokyo Metropolitan Route 311 in Kanpachi-dori, Ota-ku, Tokyo, on a bright and clear late summer's morning

Traveling along Tokyo Metropolitan Route 311 along Kanpachi-dori, Ota-ku, Tokyo, on a bright and clear late summer's morning

Keeping left towards Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminals 1 and 2 along Kanpachi-dori, Ota-ku, Tokyo, shortly after exiting Tokyo Metropolitan Route 311 on a bright and clear winter's morning

Making a right turn towards Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 1 on a bright and clear late summer's morning

Making a brief stop at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 1 on a bright and clear late summer's morning

Keeping right towards Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2 shortly after departing Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 1 on a bright and clear late summer's morning

Making a right turn towards Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2 on a bright and clear late summer's morning

Finally arriving at the free inter-airport terminal shuttle bus stand located outside the domestic arrivals and meeting lobby on the first floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2 on a bright and clear late summer's morning
 
After a routine free main inter-airport terminal shuttle bus journey duration of 10 minutes from Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 3 situated across the airport complex, I securely arrived at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2 by 9.10 a.m.. Checking to see that I had not left anything behind, I disembarked from the shuttle bus and went into the domestic arrivals and meeting lobby on the first floor before eventually catching a nearby elevator down towards the first basement level to search for a nearby major fast food restaurant located adjacent to Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station for breakfast.
 
Soon enough, I finally arrived at a major fast food restaurant joint, known as McDonald's (Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station Branch) (マクドナルド 羽田空港第2ターミナル駅店), at around 9.15 a.m.. Entering the outlet, I went to the main order counter and ordered three pieces of hash browns and a medium-sized cup of Fanta grape for myself, given that Fanta grape would be one of my first mandatory favorite drinks once I had landed in Japan. Upon making the required payment for my meal and receiving my main orders, I promptly found a vacant seating spot to enjoy my light fast food breakfast.
 
The free inter-airport terminal shuttle bus stand and vehicular pick-up and drop-off points located outside the domestic arrivals and meeting lobby on the first floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2 on a bright and clear late summer's morning

The yellow free inter-airport terminal shuttle bus at the free inter-airport terminal shuttle bus stand located outside the domestic arrivals and meeting lobby on the first floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2 on a bright and clear late summer's morning

Walking through the domestic arrivals and meeting lobby located on the first floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2 during the early morning rush hours

Overlooking some retail outlet shops and small cafeterias in the domestic arrivals and meeting lobby located on the first floor at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2 shortly before I took the nearest elevator down to the first basement level

Overlooking some retail outlet shops and small cafeterias in the first basement level at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2 during the early morning rush hours

Walking through the first basement level at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2 past Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station in search of a nearby fast food restaurant outlet joint during the early morning rush hours

Finally arriving at McDonald's (Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station Branch) (マクドナルド 羽田空港第2ターミナル駅店) located in the first basement level at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2 during the early morning rush hours

The main order counter in McDonald's (Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station Branch) (マクドナルド 羽田空港第2ターミナル駅店) located in the first basement level at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2 shortly after I had entered

A single tray of three hash browns and a medium-sized cup of Fanta grape soft drink for myself at McDonald's (Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station Branch) (マクドナルド 羽田空港第2ターミナル駅店)

The interior view of McDonald's (Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station Branch) (マクドナルド 羽田空港第2ターミナル駅店) from my seating area shortly after I had finished my light fast food breakfast
 
After having a rather light and quick fast food breakfast meal at McDonald's (Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station Branch) (マクドナルド 羽田空港第2ターミナル駅店) situated directly next to the central ticketing concourse at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station, the clock was now showing 9.30 a.m.. Given that the time had come for me to head to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama, I took my baggage and proceeded to the automatic ticketing machines situated in the major Tokyo Monorail ticketing concourse at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station to purchase a single one-way ticket to Yokohama.
 
Once I had purchased my one-way railway over ticket to Yokohama, I passed through the the automated monorail ticketing gates and safely checked the departure time for the next Haneda Express train bound for Hamamatsucho. According to the departure information screens, the closest Haneda Express train bound for Hamamatsucho that I could catch would depart by 9.49 a.m. sharp from Track No. 2. Without wasting anymore time, I took the escalator down to the main station platforms for the first main section of the coming trip to Hamamatsucho, eventually reaching there safely at 9.35 a.m..
 
The Tokyo Monorail (Japanese: 東京モノレール; Traditional Chinese: 東京單軌電車; Simplified Chinese: 东京单轨电车; Malay: Monorel Tokyo) is a passenger straddle-beam monorail line connecting the major Hamamatsucho district in central Minato-ku, Tokyo, with Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) located near Tokyo Bay by the suburban outskirts of Ota-ku, Tokyo, Japan. It is currently one of the two regular railroad lines serving Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport), the most scenic major railway route connecting to and from the main complex of Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) and the world's most heavily-traveled monorail railway network, with more than approximately 51.2 million passengers traveling on the system by fiscal 2018. The line has a maximum operating top speed of 80 km/h (50 mph).
 
The line was officially opened for revenue service from 17 September 1964 in preparation for the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. From 8 December 2001, limited-stop Rapid services were introduced to provide faster access between Hamamatsucho and the airport, with the line extended to the new Terminal 2 from 1 December 2004. A main passing loop at Showajima Station was also opened from 18 March 2007, permitting non-stop Haneda Express services to commence and operate alongside the existing Rapid and local services.
 
From 21 October 2010, the railway line began to serve the new International Terminal with the opening of Haneda Airport International Terminal Station. The Tokyo Monorail thus became valid for passengers traveling with a Japan Rail Pass with the opening of a major JR East Travel Service Center located in the arrivals and meeting lobby of the International Terminal. From 14 March 2020, the International Terminal was renamed as Terminal 3 once Terminal 2 began to cater to international flights operated by All Nippon Airways.
 
As of 1 February 2023, the 6-car 1000 series, 2000 series & 10000 series EMUs operate as the various Haneda Express (空港快速), Rapid (区間快速) and local (普通) services at top speeds of up to 80 km/h (50 mph). Throughout the day, several local trains stop briefly at Showajima Station for just two minutes to allow faster Haneda Express train services to pass through without stopping. There are no charges necessary for the Tokyo Monorail for tourists traveling with a major nationwide Japan Rail Pass, since East Japan Railway Company (JR East) operates local travel service centers in Terminal 2 and Terminal 3 at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport).
 
Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station (Japanese: 羽田空港第2ターミナル駅; Thai: สถานี สนามบินฮาเนดะ อาคาร 2; Chinese: 羽田機場第2航站樓站) is an airport rail link station complex located in Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) at 4-2 Haneda-kuko 3-chome, Ota-ku, Tokyo, Japan. Managed exclusively by Tokyo Monorail Co., Ltd., it is located beneath the major passenger terminal of Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2 and functions as the major southern terminal railway station for the Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line. The railroad station is safely connected to the East Entrance of Haneda Airport Terminal 1·2 Station via a long underground passage in the lower levels of Terminals 1 and 2, thus permitting direct railway transfers to the Keikyu Airport Line.
 
The station was opened for revenue passenger service from 1 December 2004 to coincide with the opening of Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2, with its native Japanese name written as 羽田空港第2ビル駅 upon its opening. It also replaced Haneda Airport Station as the southern terminus for the Tokyo Monorail, with the former railroad terminus being renamed as Haneda Airport Terminal 1 Station. From 14 March 2020, the Tokyo Monorail station directly attained its current Japanese name as 羽田空港第2ターミナル駅 after the major International Terminal was rebranded as Terminal 3. As of 18 March 2023, the station has an underground island platform level serving two tracks, with an additional island platform reserved for seasonal events.
 
The main entrance to McDonald's (Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station Branch) (マクドナルド 羽田空港第2ターミナル駅店) located on the first basement level at Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) Terminal 2 during the early morning rush hours as I begin to make my way to Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station

Approaching the automated ticketing machines in the main ticketing concourse at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station during the early morning rush hours

Making a stop by the automated ticketing machines in the main ticketing concourse at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station to purchase my one-way railway ticket to Yokohama

Approaching the ticketing gates in the main ticketing concourse at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station during the early morning rush hours

Approaching the escalators leading down to the main station platforms at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station during the early morning rush hours

Finally arriving at the main station platforms at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station during the early morning rush hours

A 6-car Tokyo Monorail 10000 series EMU Set No. 10031F, painted in the "Kiki & Lala Monorail Twinkle Tour" special livery and operating as the 9.35 a.m. local service bound for Hamamatsucho, on Track No. 2 at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station

A 6-car Tokyo Monorail 1000 series EMU Set No. 1085F, painted in the original Tokyo Monorail 1000 series black with red and white cream livery and operating as the 9.39 a.m. "Haneda Express" service bound for Hamamatsucho, on Track No. 1 at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station

The view of the main station platforms at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station during the early morning rush hours

An out-of-service 6-car Tokyo Monorail 2000 series EMU Set No. 2041F on Track No. 2 at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station

Overlooking the disused island platform from Track No. 2 at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station during the early morning rush hours

A 6-car Tokyo Monorail 10000 series EMU Set No. 10021F, operating as the 9.45 a.m. local service bound for Hamamatsucho, on Track No. 1 at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station

Track No. 2 at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station shortly before the 9.49 a.m. "Haneda Express" service bound for Hamamatsucho arrived at the station
 
After spending almost 10 minutes of anticipated waiting on the platforms, a 6-car Tokyo Monorail 10000 series EMU Set No. 10051F eventually arrived at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station at 9.45 a.m. on Track No. 2. The train had initially arrived from Hamamatsucho in Minato-ku, Tokyo, as a Rapid Service bound for Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport), and was to directly undergo a short change of direction before becoming the 9.49 a.m. Haneda Express monorail service bound for Hamamatsucho later on. Once all of the train doors were opened, I promptly boarded the train via Car No. 1 (10051) and secured an observation seat by the driver's cab.
 
Once the clock struck exactly 9.49 a.m. sharp, all the main train doors were closed, and the Tokyo Monorail Haneda Express train service pulled out of Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station for the coming routine morning trip of only 19 minutes to the really modern and colossal hustle and bustle of the Hamamatsucho district situated in the very heart of downtown Minato-ku, Tokyo. I was then on my way for a routine regional morning monorail trip duration of 19 minutes to the really modern hustle and bustle of the main Hamamatsucho district located in downtown Minato-ku, Tokyo.
 
東京モノレール10000形 (10051F) 空港快速 浜松町行き 羽田空港第2ターミナル駅に入線シーン

The 6-car Tokyo Monorail 10000 series EMU Set No. 10051F, now operating as the 9.49 a.m. "Haneda Express" service bound for Hamamatsucho, on Track No. 2 at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station

The interior of Car No. 1 (10051) on board the 6-car Tokyo Monorail 10000 series EMU Set No. 10051F, operating as the 9.49 a.m. "Haneda Express" service bound for Hamamatsucho, during the boarding process on Track No. 2 at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station

The route guidance information panel above the train doors on board Car No. 1 (10051) of the 6-car Tokyo Monorail 10000 series EMU Set No. 10051F, operating as the 9.49 a.m. "Haneda Express" service bound for Hamamatsucho, during the boarding process on Track No. 2 at Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station

Awaiting departure from Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station

東京モノレール10000形 (10051) 空港快速 浜松町行き 羽田空港第2ターミナル駅から終点浜松町駅間
 
After a routine regional morning commuter rush journey duration of just 19 minutes from Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) situated close to the waters of Tokyo Bay in the outskirts of Ota-ku, Tokyo, I finally arrived at the Hamamatsucho terminal station by precisely 10.08 a.m.. Checking to see that I had not left anything behind, I safely disembarked from the train and took the nearest elevator down to the Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line transit concourse before eventually making my way directly to the major JR Line interchange ticketing gates.
 
Inserting the single one-way railway ticket into one of the automatic JR Line interchange ticketing gates, I securely went to check the departure time for the next Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local train bound for Kamata to escape the sweltering heat. According to the railway departure information panels, the next Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line would depart at 10.17 a.m. sharp from Track No. 4, with a quick cross-platform interchange to Yokohama available at Kamata Station. With that moment, I promptly took the nearest elevator down to Tracks No. 3 and 4 in preparation for the second journey section to Kamata, eventually reaching there safely at 10.15 a.m..
 
Hamamatsucho Station (Japanese: 浜松町駅; Traditional Chinese: 濱松町車站; Simplified Chinese: 滨松町车站) is a large main interchange railway terminal complex in the central Hamamatsucho district between 3-1 Kaigan 1-chome and 4-12 Hamamatsucho 2-chome in Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan. Operated by both East Japan Railway Company (JR East) and Tokyo Monorail Co., Ltd., it mainly serves the Hamamatsucho district and is one of the 13 main railroad stations to feature cross-platform interchange services between the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line and Yamanote Line. The railroad station also serves as the northern railway terminus for the Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line, with the main railroad station directly connected to Daimon Station served by the Toei Asakusa Line and Toei Oedo Line.
 
The station was opened for service on 16 December 1909 as an intermediate station along both the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line and Yamanote Line, with cross-platform interchange provided between both the urban lines. From 17 September 1964, it eventually became the northern terminal station for the Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line, with the monorail having an elevated bay platform two levels above the two JR Line island platforms. The station was also connected to the original Tokyo World Trade Center building until the building was closed down on 30 June 2021 and demolished in mid-2021 for redevelopment purposes.
 
The 6-car Tokyo Monorail 10000 series EMU Set No. 10051F, now operating as the 10.10 a.m. "Haneda Express" service bound for Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport), at Hamamatsucho Station

The Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line arrival platform at Hamamatsucho Station during the morning off-peak hours

The 6-car Tokyo Monorail 10000 series EMU Set No. 10051F, operating as the 10.10 a.m. "Haneda Express" service bound for Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport), departing Hamamatsucho Station

Gazing out at the Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line tracks from the arrival platform at Hamamatsucho Station on a bright and clear late summer's morning

Gazing out at the Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line tracks from the arrival platform at Hamamatsucho Station, with another Tokyo Monorail 10000 series EMU approaching the station on a bright and clear late summer's morning

A 6-car Tokyo Monorail 10000 series EMU Set No. 10021F, which would operate as the 10.16 a.m. local service bound for Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport), approaching Hamamatsucho Station

An additional view of the Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line arrival platform at Hamamatsucho Station shortly before I headed down to the Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line transit concourse during the morning off-peak hours

The Tokyo Monorail Haneda Airport Line exit ticketing gates at Hamamatsucho Station during the morning off-peak hours

Walking through the main JR Line transit concourse at Hamamatsucho Station during the morning off-peak hours

Finally arriving at Tracks No. 3 and 4 at Hamamatsucho Station during the morning off-peak hours

The overhead departure information panel for Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line trains departing from Track No. 4 at Hamamatsucho Station indicating that the next Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local train bound for Kamata would depart at 10.17 a.m.

The overall view of the JR Line station platforms at Hamamatsucho Station during the morning off-peak hours

Tracks No. 3 and 4 serving the Yamanote Line Outer Loop trains bound for Shinagawa, Osaki and Shibuya and the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line trains bound for Shinagawa, Yokohama and Ofuna at Hamamatsucho Station during the morning off-peak hours

Track No. 4 at Hamamatsucho Station shortly before the 10.17 a.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service arrived at the station
 
After spending less than a few minutes of anticipated waiting across Tracks No. 3 and 4, a 10-car E233 series EMU, currently operating as the 10.17 a.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local train service bound for Kamata, arrived at Hamamatsucho Station at exactly 10.17 a.m. on Track No. 4. Once the train doors were opened, I boarded the train via Car No. 6 and settled in for the coming rapid morning commuter trip of just 17 minutes to Kamata Station located in the neighborhoods of Kamata and Nishi-kamata, Ota-ku, Tokyo.
 
Soon enough, within just a few seconds, the train doors were safely closed, and the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local train service finally pulled out of Hamamatsucho Station for the rest of its early morning commuter journey time of approximately 48 minutes from Akabane to Kamata via Tokyo and Shinagawa. I was then en route for a coming regional morning commuter travel duration of approximately 17 minutes to Kamata Station located by the suburban neighborhoods of Kamata and Nishi-kamata, Ota-ku, Tokyo.
 
A 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 10.17 a.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Kamata, arriving at Hamamatsucho Station on Track No. 4

The interior of Car No. 6 on board the 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 10.17 a.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Kamata, during the boarding process on Track No. 4 at Hamamatsucho Station

Finally departing Hamamatsucho Station

The route guidance information panel above the train doors on board Car No. 6 of the 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 10.17 a.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Kamata, indicating that the next station is Tamachi

Making a brief stop at Tamachi Station

Traveling past some office and residential infrastructure in Takanawa 2-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo, between Tamachi and Takanawa Gateway Stations

Making a brief stop at Takanawa Gateway Station

Overlooking several office infrastructure in Takanawa 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo, as the train approaches Shinagawa Station

Making a brief stop at Shinagawa Station

Overlooking the Keikyu Main Line flyover viaduct in Takanawa 4-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo, shortly after departing Shinagawa Station

Traveling past a construction site near some industrial infrastructure in Hiromachi, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, between Shinagawa and Oimachi Stations

Making a brief stop at Oimachi Station

Bypassing some residential housing estates in Oi 6-chome, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, between Oimachi and Omori Stations

Making a brief stop at Omori Station

Bypassing some local neighborhood retail outlet stores in Sanno 3-chome, Ota-ku, Tokyo, between Omori and Kamata Stations

Overlooking several residential housing estates and industrial infrastructure in Nishi-kamata 5-chome, Ota-ku, Tokyo, as the train approaches the Kamata terminal station

Finally arriving at the Kamata terminal station
 
After a regional morning commuter trip timing of approximately 17 minutes from the Hamamatsucho district in the heart of downtown Minato-ku Tokyo, I soon arrived at the Kamata terminal station securely at 10.34 a.m. sharp on Tracks No. 2 & 3. Checking to ensure that I did not leave anything behind on board, I safely alighted from the out-of-service 10-car train and crossed over to Track No. 1 for the coming sector to Yokohama. Since the nearest Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local train bound for Ofuna would depart at 10.37 a.m. from Track No. 1, I waited at a suitable boarding area along the platform.
 
Soon enough, a 10-car E233 series EMU, currently operating as the 10.37 a.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Ofuna via Yokohama and Negishi, safely arrived at Kamata Station at exactly 10.37 a.m. sharp on Track No. 1. Boarding the train via Car No. 6, I secured a nearby empty seat for the major morning commuter trip timing of just 18 minutes to Yokohama. Later on, all the train doors were closed, and the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local train pulled out of Kamata Station for the rest of its commuter journey of 2 hours 02 minutes from Omiya to Ofuna. I was finally en route for a morning commuter journey of 18 minutes to the hustle and bustle of Yokohama.
 
Kamata Station (Japanese: 蒲田駅; Chinese: 蒲田站) is a major interchange railway station complex situated between 13-1 Kamata 5-chome and 69-1 Nishi-kamata 7-chome, Ota-ku, Tokyo, Japan. Operated under East Japan Railway Company (JR East) and Tokyu Corporation, it currently serves as a compulsory stop for all main commuter services along the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line and as a double-line railway terminus for the Tokyu Ikegami Line and Tokyu Tamagawa Line. The Tokaido Main Line also runs parallel towards the station complex on the outermost tracks without stopping.
 
The railroad station was opened on 11 April 1904 as an intermediate station along the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line, with the middle platform catering to trains beginning and ending at the railway station complex. It then became the southern major terminus point for the Tokyu Ikegami Line on 6 October 1922, with the Tokyu Tamagawa Line serving the major interchange station from 1 November 1923. As of 18 March 2023, the station has just two island platforms serving three main tracks for the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line and five bay platforms serving four tracks for the Tokyu Ikegami Line and Tokyu Tamagawa Line.
 
Tracks No. 1 and 2 serving the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line trains bound for Ofuna via Yokohama and terminating trains at Kamata Station during the morning off-peak hours

The departure information panels for Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line trains departing from Track No. 1 at Kamata Station indicating that the next Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local train bound for Ofuna would depart at 10.37 a.m.

Track No. 1 at Kamata Station shortly before the 10.37 a.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Ofuna arrived at the station

A 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 10.37 a.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Ofuna, arriving at Kamata Station on Track No. 1

The interior of Car No. 6 on board the 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 10.37 a.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Ofuna, during the boarding process on Track No. 1 at Kamata Station

Finally departing Kamata Station

The route guidance information panel above the train doors on board Car No. 6 of the 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 10.37 a.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Ofuna, indicating that the next station is Kawasaki

Overlooking several residential housing estates and industrial infrastructure in Nishi-rokugo 3-chome, Ota-ku, Tokyo, between Kamata and Kawasaki Stations

Bypassing a large recreational field near the Tama River in Nishirokugo 4-chome, Ota-ku, Tokyo, between Kamata and Kawasaki Stations

Crossing the Tama River from Nishirokugo 4-chome, Ota-ku, Tokyo, to Horikawa-cho, Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki, between Kamata and Kawasaki Stations

Overlooking the Lazona Kawasaki Plaza (ラゾーナ川崎プラザ) shopping mall in Horikawa-cho, Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki, as the train approaches Kawasaki Station

Making a brief stop at Kawasaki Station

Bypassing the JR Kawasaki Tower Commercial Building located in Omiya-cho, Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki, shortly after departing Kawasaki Station

The interior of Car No. 6 on board the 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 10.37 a.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Ofuna, between Kawasaki and Tsurumi Stations

Bypassing some residential housing estates in Tsukuno-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, between Kawasaki and Tsurumi Stations

Making a brief stop at Tsurumi Station

Overlooking the Tsurumi Line flyover viaduct in Tsurumi 1-chome, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, between Tsurumi and Shin-koyasu Stations

About to cross the flyover bridge above the Tokaido Main Line past some residential housing estates in Kishiya 1-chome, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, between Tsurumi and Shin-koyasu Stations

Bypassing some hillside residential housing estates in Shin-koyasu 1-chome, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama, adjacent to the Tokaido Main Line, Yokosuka Line and Shonan-Shinjuku Line tracks between Tsurumi and Shin-koyasu Stations

Making a brief stop at Shin-koyasu Station

Bypassing some residential housing estates in Shin-koyasu 1-chome, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama, shortly after departing Shin-koyasu Station

Bypassing some hillside residential housing estates while intersecting with the Yokohama Line tracks in Urashimaoka, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama, between Shin-koyasu and Higashi-kanagawa Stations

Making a brief stop at Higashi-kanagawa Station

Bypassing some residential housing estates in Tammachi 1-chome, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama, between Higashi-kanagawa and Yokohama Stations

Bypassing the JR East Hotel Mets Yokohama in Tsuruya-cho 1-chome, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama, as the train approaches Yokohama Station

Finally arriving at Yokohama Station
 
After a routine morning commuter trip of 18 minutes from Kamata Station located directly between Kamata and Nishi-kamata, Ota-ku, Tokyo, I safely arrived at Yokohama Station at exactly 10.55 a.m. on Track No. 3. Checking to ensure that I had not left anything behind, I securely disembarked from the train and caught the nearest elevator down to the JR Line interchange transit concourse before inserting my used one-way railway journey ticket into one of the automatic ticketing machines and heading into the JR Line ticketing concourse.
 
Once I was in the JR Line ticketing concourse, I quickly made my way to the East Entrance of the main station complex in search of a cab stand to get a black cab to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama. Bypassing a few major outlet stores in Lumine Yokohama, I soon arrived at the cab stands located at the East Entrance of the station complex by around 11.05 a.m.. Flagging down the closest black standard-sized cab, I instantly informed the driver to take me to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama in downtown Naka-ku, Yokohama.
 
The cab driver then informed me that the Oakwood Suites Yokohama was located in the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot, even offering to fetch me to the pick-up and drop-off point of the tower complex. Readily agreeing to this recommendation, the driver then helped to load my bulkier baggage into the rear trunk area while I immediately got into the major passenger seat. With everything safely loaded, I departed Yokohama Station within just a few seconds for a short early afternoon cab journey of only 10 minutes to the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot in downtown Naka-ku, Yokohama.
 
Yokohama Station (Japanese: 横浜駅; Malay: Stesen Yokohama; Traditional Chinese: 橫濱車站; Simplified Chinese: 横滨车站) is a major intercity railway station on the central intersection between 16-1 Takashima 2-chome & 1-1 Minami-saiwai 1-chome in Nishi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan. It is the central railway station for the modern satellite port city of Yokohama, the fifth-busiest railway station complex in the world and the busiest intercity railroad terminal in Kanagawa Prefecture, with approximately 760 million passengers passing through the main station complex in 2013. Apart from catering to the Tokaido Main Line, Shonan-Shinjuku Line, Yokohama Line, Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line and Yokosuka Line, the railroad terminal also serves the Sagami Railway Main Line, Minatomirai Line, Keikyu Main Line and Tokyu Toyoko Line and Yokohama Municipal Subway Blue Line.
 
The railway station was opened on 15 August 1915 after the original station was renamed as Sakuragicho Station, which had been serving the major city since 12 June 1872. Initially serving the JR Lines, the railroad station became an interchange railroad terminal for the Tokyu Toyoko Line on 18 May 1928 and moved to its current station location on 15 October 1928 after the 1923 Great Kanto earthquake. From 27 December 1933, the local railroad station complex became an interchange station for the Sotetsu Main Line, with the Yokohama Municipal Subway Blue Line securely serving the railroad station complex on 4 September 1976.
 
From 1 February 2004, with the official railway closure of the Tokyu Toyoko Line section between Yokohama and Sakuragicho, the local railway station became an interchange railway station with the Minatomirai Line, offering direct revenue train services both to and from the Tokyu Toyoko Line using new major underground platforms. The station houses several department stores in its complex, such as the Yodobashi Camera Multimedia Yokohama electronics store and the Yokohama Takashimaya Department Store.
 
Tracks No. 3 and 4 serving the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line & Yokohama Line trains at Yokohama Station during the early afternoon off-peak hours

The JR Line interchange transit concourse at Yokohama Station during the early afternoon off-peak hours

Approaching the JR Line exit ticketing gates in the JR Line interchange transit concourse at Yokohama Station during the early afternoon off-peak hours

The JR Line ticketing concourse at Yokohama Station shortly after I had exited through the JR Line ticketing gates during the early afternoon off-peak hours

Bypassing the JR Ticket Office in the JR Line ticketing concourse at Yokohama Station during the early afternoon off-peak hours

Walking through the main JR Line ticketing concourse at Yokohama Station in the direction leading to Lumine Yokohama during the early afternoon off-peak hours

About to take the escalators down to the first basement level of Lumine Yokohama near the East Entrance at Yokohama Station on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

Walking through the first basement level at Lumine Yokohama on the way to the cab stands near the East Entrance at Yokohama Station

Walking past more retail outlet stores in the first basement level at Lumine Yokohama while getting closer to the cab stands near the East Entrance at Yokohama Station

Finally arriving at the cab stands outside Lumine Yokohama near the East Entrance at Yokohama Station

The black cab that would soon take me to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama in the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot at the cab stands outside Lumine Yokohama near the East Entrance at Yokohama Station

Finally departing the cab stands outside Lumine Yokohama near the East Entrance at Yokohama Station

Entering the main roads of Takashima 2-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, shortly after departing Yokohama Station on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

Overlooking the Yokohama Mitsui Building while traveling along the roads of Takashima 2-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

Making a left turn along the main roads of Takashima 2-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, adjacent to the Shuto Expressway Yokohane Route K1 on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

Bypassing the Chengsi Japan Co., Ltd. Building between Tochinoki-dori and Takashima 1-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

About to make a right turn towards Minatomirai 4-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, from Suzukake-dori, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

Traveling along the roads of Minatomirai 2-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, near the Kitanaka Bridge on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

Overlooking the InterContinental Hotel Yokohama Grand, where I previously stayed at with my family in December 2015, while crossing the Kitanaka Bridge along Kitanaka-dori 6-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

The Yokohama Kitanaka Knot coming into view while my cab is about to make a left turn towards Kitanaka-dori 5-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

Making a right turn to the main vehicular pick-up and drop-off point at the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot along Kitanaka-dori 5-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

Finally arriving at the main vehicular pick-up and drop-off area at the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon
 
After a rapid and routine early afternoon cab trip of only 10 minutes from Yokohama Station located in downtown Nishi-ku, Yokohama, I eventually arrived at the major vehicular pick-up and drop-off area at the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot safely by 11.15 a.m.. Paying my cab fare, the driver got out and helped me to unload my bulkier baggage from the rear trunk while I checked to see that nothing had been left behind. I then thanked the cab driver for his services and followed all the signage posts of the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot leading to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama.
 
Soon enough, I arrived at the first floor express elevator lobby entrance door to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama safely by 11.20 a.m.. Catching the nearest express elevator up to the main hotel lobby on the 46th floor, I went over to the major check-in reception counter and informed a hotel staff receptionist on duty that I had an upcoming 10-day stay with the hotel. Showing her my passport and relevant traveling documents, I informed the staff receptionist of my plan to check in early since I was still feeling quite tired from the long overnight flight from Singapore earlier on.
 
At the same time, I also requested the receptionist for a late check-out time on Friday (8 September), considering that my main return flight back home to Singapore would depart really late at night. Upon making an early hotel check-in fee payment, I safely received my assigned room keys at 11.30 a.m. sharp. The hotel staff receptionist informed me that I would be assigned to Room No. 5023 located on the 50th floor for the coming stay in Yokohama, with a late hotel check-out fee applicable on the day of my check-out from the hotel premises.
 
With that instant, I quickly thanked the hotel check-in staff receptionist for her services and headed over to the hotel elevator lobby with my baggage. Catching the closest guest elevator to the 50th floor, I immediately walked along the passageway before safely arriving outside my assigned Room No. 5023 at 11.35 a.m.. Tapping one of the key cards onto the sensor, I entered the hotel room and was promptly impressed by its layout and decor. I even inserted one of the key cards into the key card power sensor to brighten it up further.
 
My studio room had a small kitchenette by the main entrance door, with a refrigerator and an induction cooking stove, though I would not be doing any cooking since I would be out daily. There was also one single king bed and a small balcony that offered views of downtown Naka-ku, Yokohama, together with a built-in major safe in the closet. Entering the bathroom, I quickly saw that there was a cubicle containing a shower and bath tub by the sink and an all-in-one washing and drying machine closer to my toilet. This would be very convenient since I could wash all my clothes overnight after returning from my long day trips.
 
Placing my bulkier baggage close on the folding baggage rack, I promptly sorted out my daily attire for the coming days ahead prior to washing my used clothes and having a warm shower to reduce the risks of contracting COVID-19 in Japan. Upon washing up, I quickly changed into a new set of clothes and got my personal electronic gadgets to be charged up prior to having a well-earned rest in my assigned Room No. 5023 at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama for the afternoon. I also took the opportunity to inform both my parents that I had arrived safely in Yokohama.
 
The emergency vehicle parking spaces near the main vehicular pick-up and drop-off area at the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

Approaching the main entrance to the passageway leading to the Kitanaka Brick & White commercial and cultural shopping area at the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot

Bypassing the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot Entrance at Bashamichi Station in the Kitanaka Brick & White commercial and cultural shopping area on a bright and clear late spring's early afternoon while getting closer to the first floor entrance to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama

Finally arriving at the first floor hotel entrance and express elevator lobby to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

Approaching the observation area in the main hotel lobby located on the 46th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

The overall view of the main hotel lobby located on the 46th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

Making my way to the hotel guest elevator lobby in the main hotel lobby located on the 46th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

Finally arriving at my assigned Room No. 5023 located on the 50th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

The washing and drying machine close to the toilet in the bathroom of my assigned Room No. 5023 located on the 50th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama

The shower and bath tub cubicle in the bathroom of my assigned Room No. 5023 located on the 50th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama

The living room and kitchenette area in my assigned Room No. 5023 located on the 50th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

Overlooking the Yokohama Landmark Tower and Minato Mirai 21 business district from my assigned Room No. 5023 located on the 50th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon

One additional view of my assigned Room No. 5023 located on the 50th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama during my afternoon rest on a bright and clear late summer's early afternoon
 
After spending the rest of the early afternoon sorting out my clothes and having a long, well-earned afternoon rest in my assigned Room No. 5023 located on the 50th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama, the in-room clock was finally showing 2.45 p.m.. Given that I had some errands to run later on, I gathered my necessary belongings and departed my Room No. 5023 before catching the nearest elevator down to the main hotel lobby situated on the 46th floor, thus reaching there safely by around 2.50 p.m. later that afternoon.
 
Transferring to the express elevator lobby area, I immediately caught the nearest express elevator down to the first floor of The Tower Yokohama Kitanaka before heading outside to the major Yokohama Kitanaka Knot Entrance of Bashamichi Station. Once I had entered the station complex safely, I took two sets of escalators down to the station's major ticketing concourse level before heading to the automated ticketing machines to purchase a one-way Minatomirai Line ticket to Yokohama Station for an affordable price of ¥200 (S$1.85).
 
Upon purchasing my Minatomirai Line railroad ticket, I immediately passed through the ticketing gates and checked the departure timing for the next direct Minatomirai Line & Tokyu Toyoko Line local train bound for Shibuya. According to the train departure information screens in the concourse, the closest Minatomirai Line & Tokyu Toyoko Line local train service bound for Shibuya would depart by 3.08 p.m. from Track No. 2. Without wasting any time, I quickly took the closest escalator down to the station platforms for the trip to Yokohama Station, thus reaching there safely at three o' clock.
 
Bashamichi Station (Japanese: 馬車道駅; Traditional Chinese: 馬車道站; Thai: สถานีบาชามิจิ; Korean: 바샤미치역) is a major underground railroad station at 49 Honcho 5-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan. Operated by Yokohama Minatomirai Railway, it is situated on the Minatomirai Line and primarily serves as the nearest railway station for the Yokohama Red Brick Warehouse, Kanagawa Museum of Cultural History and the NYK Maritime Museum. Having opened for service on 1 February 2004, the major station complex currently serves as a mandatory stopping point for all Commuter Express, Express and local services connecting both to and from the Tokyu Toyoko Line and Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin Line with just one underground island platform serving two tracks.
 
The observation area in the main hotel lobby located on the 46th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama on a bright and clear late summer's mid-afternoon

Overlooking the Port of Yokohama from the observation area in the main hotel lobby located on the 46th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama on a bright and clear late summer's mid-afternoon

Approaching the express elevator lobby connecting to the first floor hotel entrance and the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot on the 46th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama on a bright and clear late summer's mid-afternoon

The first floor hotel entrance to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama on a bright and clear late summer's mid-afternoon while making my way to Bashamichi Station

Finally arriving at the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot Entrance at Bashamichi Station on a bright and clear late summer's mid-afternoon

Walking through the first basement level passageway leading to the main station ticketing concourse from the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot Entrance at Bashamichi Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

About to take an additional set of escalators down to the main station ticketing concourse located on the second basement level from the first basement level at Bashamichi Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

The main station ticketing concourse located on the second basement level at Bashamichi Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

About to pass through the ticketing gates in the main station ticketing concourse located on the second basement level at Bashamichi Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

The main transit concourse located on the second basement level leading to the station platforms at Bashamichi Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

Finally arriving at the station platforms located on the third basement level at Bashamichi Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

Track No. 2 serving the Minatomirai Line & Tokyu Toyoko Line trains bound for Shibuya, Wakoshi and Shakujii-koen via the Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin Line & Seibu Lines at Bashamichi Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

An 8-car Yokohama Minatomirai Railway Y500 series EMU, operating as the three o' clock Minatomirai Line & Tokyu Toyoko Line local service bound for Shakujii-koen via the Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin Line & Seibu Lines, arriving at Bashamichi Station on Track No. 2

Track No. 1 serving the Tokyu Toyoko Line & Minatomirai Line trains bound for Motomachi-chukagai at Bashamichi Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

The overhead departure information panel for Minatomirai Line & Tokyu Toyoko Line trains departing from Track No. 2 at Bashamichi Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours indicating that the next Minatomirai Line & Tokyu Toyoko Line local train bound for Shibuya would depart at 3.08 p.m.

The station name plate across the railway tracks on Track No. 2 at Bashamichi Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

A 10-car Tokyu 5050-4000 series EMU, operating as the 3.03 p.m. Minatomirai Line & Tokyu Toyoko Line Limited Express "F Liner" service bound for Shinrin-koen via the Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin Line & Tobu Tojo Line from Motomachi-chukagai, passing through Bashamichi Station on Track No. 2

The overall view of the station platforms located on the third basement level at Bashamichi Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

Track No. 2 at Bashamichi Station shortly before the 3.08 p.m. Minatomirai Line & Tokyu Toyoko Line local service bound for Shibuya arrived at the station
 
After spending almost 10 minutes of anticipated waiting along the railroad station platforms, an 8-car Tokyo Metro 17000 series EMU, operating as the 3.08 p.m. Minatomirai Line & Tokyu Toyoko Line local rail service bound for Shibuya via Yokohama, safely arrived at Bashamichi Station at 3.08 p.m. on Track No. 2. Once all the train doors were automatically opened, I instantly boarded the train via Car No. 2 and secured a vacant seat for the short and routine mid-afternoon downtown commuter rush trip time of five minutes over to Yokohama Station in the heart of downtown Nishi-ku, Yokohama.
 
Soon enough, all the train doors were closed, and the Minatomirai Line and Tokyu Toyoko Line local train soon pulled out of Bashamichi Station for the remainder of its routine mid-afternoon commuter rush journey duration of only 44 minutes from Motomachi-chukagai to Shibuya. I was then en route for a short and regional mid-afternoon commuter rush journey duration of just five minutes to Yokohama Station situated securely between the major neighborhoods of Takashima and Minami-saiwai in Nishi-ku, Yokohama.
 
An 8-car Tokyo Metro 17000 series EMU, operating as the 3.08 p.m. Minatomirai Line & Tokyu Toyoko Line local service bound for Shibuya, arriving at Bashamichi Station on Track No. 2

The interior of Car No. 2 on board the 8-car Tokyo Metro 17000 series EMU, operating as the 3.08 p.m. Minatomirai Line & Tokyu Toyoko Line local service bound for Shibuya, shortly before departing Bashamichi Station

Finally departing Bashamichi Station

The route guidance information panel above the train doors on board Car No. 2 of the 8-car Tokyo Metro 17000 series EMU, operating as the 3.08 p.m. Minatomirai Line & Tokyu Toyoko Line local service bound for Shibuya, indicating that the next station is Minatomirai

Making a brief stop at Minatomirai Station

The interior of Car No. 2 on board the 8-car Tokyo Metro 17000 series EMU, operating as the 3.08 p.m. Minatomirai Line & Tokyu Toyoko Line local service bound for Shibuya, between Minatomirai and Shin-takashima Stations

Making a brief stop at Shin-takashima Station

The interior of Car No. 2 on board the 8-car Tokyo Metro 17000 series EMU, operating as the 3.08 p.m. Minatomirai Line & Tokyo Toyoko Line local service bound for Shibuya, between Shin-takashima and Yokohama Stations

Finally arriving at Yokohama Station
 
After a rapid and routine mid-afternoon commuter trip of just five minutes from Bashamichi Station in Honcho, Naka-ku, Yokohama, I safely arrived at Yokohama Station at exactly 3.13 p.m. on Track No. 2. Checking to see that there was nothing left behind, I soon disembarked from the train and took the closest elevator to the central Tokyu Toyoko Line and Minatomirai Line transit concourse area before inserting my one-way railroad ticket into the automated ticketing gates and changing to two sets of escalators to the JR Line ticketing concourse.
 
Soon enough, I was in the central JR Line ticketing concourse at Yokohama Station by precisely 3.20 p.m. sharp. Given that I had some Green Car (first class) seat reservations to make for my coming railway journeys, I instantly decided to stop by at the JR Ticket Office as the very first port of call. With that instant, I soon made my way to the main JR Ticket Office to make my Green Car (first class) seat reservations for a major Shinkansen railway day journey to Kanazawa in the Hokuriku region the next day.
 
Upon completing my necessary Green Car (first class) seat reservations in the JR Ticket Office, I quickly decided to search for a reputable electronics retail store to purchase a new video camera for myself to replace the older model that I had since 2015. With that instant, I passed through the central station concourse in the direction leading over to the West Entrance before exiting the station building complex at 3.40 p.m.. I then walked through the major streets of Minami-saiwai 2-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, in search for a local electronics retail department store near the main station complex.
 
The overall view of the Tokyu Toyoko Line & Minatomirai Line station platforms at Yokohama Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

The Tokyu Toyoko Line & Minatomirai Line transit concourse leading to the platforms at Yokohama Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

Approaching the ticketing gates in the Tokyu Toyoko Line & Minatomirai Line transit concourse at Yokohama Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

The Tokyu Toyoko Line & Minatomirai Line ticketing concourse at Yokohama Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

Taking the escalators up to the JR Line ticketing concourse from the Tokyu Toyoko Line & Minatomirai Line ticketing concourse at Yokohama Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

Walking through the JR Line ticketing concourse in the direction leading to the JR Ticket Office at Yokohama Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

Making a stopover at the JR Ticket Office in the JR Line ticketing concourse at Yokohama Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

Walking through the JR Line ticketing concourse in the direction leading to the West Entrance at Yokohama Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

Approaching the staircase and escalators leading to the West Entrance at Yokohama Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

Finally approaching the West Entrance at Yokohama Station during the mid-afternoon off-peak hours

The cab stands located outside the West Entrance at Yokohama Station on a bright and clear late summer's mid-afternoon

Overlooking the Yokohama Bay Sheraton Hotel & Towers from the West Entrance at Yokohama Station on a bright and clear late summer's mid-afternoon

Overlooking the Yokohama Takashimaya Department Store (横浜高島屋) from the West Entrance at Yokohama Station on a bright and clear late summer's mid-afternoon

Walking past several office infrastructure near the Yokohama Takashimaya Department Store (横浜高島屋) located along Minami-saiwai 1-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's mid-afternoon

About to bypass the Yokohama Municipal Subway Blue Line entrance at Yokohama Station along Minami-saiwai 1-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's mid-afternoon

Bypassing several retail outlet stores and restaurants located along Minami-saiwai 1-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's mid-afternoon

Overlooking the Yokohama Vivre Department Store (横浜ビブレ) while crossing the Minami-saiwai Bridge in Minami-saiwai 2-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's mid-afternoon

Crossing the Minami-saiwai Bridge while overlooking the Katabira River in Minami-saiwai 2-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's mid-afternoon

Finally stumbling upon Bic Camera (Yokohama West Exit Branch) (ビックカメラ 横浜西口店) located along Minami-saiwai 2-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, on a bright and clear late summer's mid-afternoon
 
After walking across the lively downtown streets of Minami-saiwai, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, for approximately five minutes from Yokohama Station, I finally arrived at a well-known electronics department store, known as Bic Camera (Yokohama West Exit Branch) (ビックカメラ 横浜西口店), at exactly 3.45 p.m. sharp. Entering the department store, I quickly took the nearest elevator to the SD card and camera section on the third floor before browsing through the various video camera models available for retail purchase.
 
Upon spending the next 45 minutes or so looking through the several video camera models on display, I quickly settled upon a Panasonic HC-V495M HD video camera as a replacement for the current 2015 Panasonic HC-WX970M video camera I had for the past eight years. With that, I directly informed a retail salesman on duty of my intended camera model to be purchased and presented my passport at the main cashier counter to get a 10% tax rebate off the purchase. Since my new video camera model would fit snugly in my hands, I was immediately quite satisfied with my purchase.
 
Once I had securely purchased my new major Panasonic video camera, the clock was eventually showing 4.40 p.m.. Given that I was feeling hungry, I quickly decided to head over to the Kannai district located in the heart of downtown Naka-ku, Yokohama, for dinner. With that moment, I took the nearest elevator down to the first floor and securely departed Bic Camera (Yokohama West Exit Branch) (ビックカメラ 横浜西口店) at 4.45 p.m. later that afternoon before walking through the core streets of Minami-saiwai, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, in the direction leading to Yokohama Station.
 
Soon enough, I finally arrived at the West Entrance at Yokohama Station at exactly 4.55 p.m. sharp. Given that I would have to take the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line directly to the Kannai district, I knew that the first thing to do would be to purchase a one-way railroad ticket to Kannai Station. Without wasting anymore time, I instantly took the escalators down to the major JR Line ticketing concourse hall and went to the JR Line ticketing machines to safely purchase a major one-way Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line railway ticket bound for Kannai Station.
 
As soon as I had purchased my one-way journey ticket to Kannai Station, I soon passed through the ticketing gates and went to check the departure time for the next Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local train service bound for Ofuna via Isogo. According to the major overhead departure information panels in the local transit concourse area, the next Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local train service bound for Ofuna would depart at exactly 5.05 p.m. sharp from Track No. 3. With that moment, I promptly caught the nearest elevator up to both Tracks No. 3 & 4 for the late afternoon journey to the Kannai district, thus reaching the platforms at five o' clock.
 
The exterior view of Bic Camera (Yokohama West Exit Branch) (ビックカメラ 横浜西口店) located along Minami-saiwai 2-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, as I begin to make my way back to Yokohama Station on a bright and clear late summer's late afternoon

Crossing the Minami-saiwai Bridge while overlooking the Katabira River in Minami-saiwai 2-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, on the way back to Yokohama Station on a bright and clear late summer's late afternoon

Bypassing several retail outlet stores and restaurants located along Minami-saiwai 1-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, on the way back to Yokohama Station on a bright and clear late summer's late afternoon

About to bypass the Yokohama Municipal Subway Blue Line entrance at Yokohama Station located along Minami-saiwai 1-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's late afternoon

Overlooking several office infrastructure near the Yokohama Takashimaya Department Store (横浜高島屋) located along Minami-saiwai 1-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, on the way back to Yokohama Station on a bright and clear late summer's late afternoon

Overlooking the Yokohama Bay Sheraton Hotel & Towers as I approach the West Entrance at Yokohama Station on a bright and clear late summer's late afternoon

Finally arriving at the West Entrance at Yokohama Station during the late afternoon rush hours

Taking the escalators down to the JR Line ticketing concourse from the West Entrance at Yokohama Station during the late afternoon rush hours

The JR Line ticketing concourse at Yokohama Station during the late afternoon rush hours

About to pass through the JR Line ticketing gates in the JR Line ticketing concourse at Yokohama Station during the late afternoon rush hours

The JR Line interchange transit concourse at Yokohama Station during the late afternoon rush hours

Finally arriving at Tracks No. 3 and 4 at Yokohama Station during the late afternoon rush hours

Tracks No. 3 and 4 serving the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line & Yokohama Line trains at Yokohama Station during the late afternoon rush hours

Overlooking Track No. 2 serving the Keikyu Main Line trains bound for Shinagawa from Track No. 3 at Yokohama Station during the late afternoon rush hours

Track No. 3 at Yokohama Station shortly before the 5.05 p.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Ofuna arrived at the station
 
After spending almost five minutes of anticipated waiting on both Tracks No. 3 and 4, a 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 5.05 p.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local train service bound for Ofuna, finally arrived at Yokohama Station at 5.05 p.m. sharp on Track No. 3. Once the train doors were opened, I quickly boarded the train via Car No. 6 and settled in for the coming major late afternoon commuter travel timing of approximately five minutes to the Kannai district located in the center of downtown Naka-ku, Yokohama.
 
Soon enough, within a few seconds, all the train doors were securely closed, and the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local train service directly pulled out of Yokohama Station for the rest of its major mid-afternoon commuter trip of approximately 1 hour 50 minutes from Minami-urawa to Ofuna. I was then en route for a regional local afternoon commuter rush journey duration of approximately five minutes over to the Kannai district in the very center of downtown Naka-ku, Yokohama, near Yokohama Chinatown.
 
A 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 5.05 p.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Ofuna, arriving at Yokohama Station on Track No. 3

The interior of Car No. 6 on board the 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 5.05 p.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Ofuna, during the boarding process on Track No. 3 at Yokohama Station

Finally departing Yokohama Station

Bypassing some downtown infrastructure in Hiranuma 1-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, between Yokohama and Sakuragicho Stations

The route guidance information panel above the train doors on board Car No. 6 of the 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 5.05 p.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Ofuna, indicating that the next station is Sakuragicho

Overlooking several downtown infrastructure in Sakuragicho 3-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, as the train approaches Sakuragicho Station

Making a brief stop at Sakuragicho Station

Bypassing several downtown infrastructure in Yoshida-machi, Naka-ku, Yokohama, between Sakuragicho and Kannai Stations

Finally arriving at Kannai Station
 
After a short and rapid late afternoon commuter trip of five minutes from Yokohama Station located in Minami-saiwai, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, I finally arrived at Kannai Station at 5.10 p.m. on Track No. 1. Checking to see that there was nothing behind, I soon disembarked from the train and quickly caught an elevator down to the main transit concourse before eventually inserting my used single train journey ticket into the automated ticketing gates and securely exiting the main station building.
 
Upon leaving the local station complex at 5.15 p.m., I decided to spend some time walking through the nearby central streets of Minato-cho and Masago-cho, Naka-ku, Yokohama, to see what restaurants were available in the local areas and if there were any that looked appealing to me. Crossing the main roads of both Minato-cho and Masago-cho, Naka-ku, Yokohama, I spent the next 15 minutes or so walking through the streets and exploring the several restaurants available to see if there were any that caught my interests.
 
Kannai Station (Japanese: 関内駅; Malay: Stesen Kannai; Traditional Chinese: 關內站; Korean: 간나이역) is an interchange railroad station complex situated mainly between 42 Onoe-cho 3-chome and 1 Minato-cho 1-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan. Owned and operated exclusively by the main Yokohama City Transportation Bureau and East Japan Railway Company (JR East), it serves as the nearest station for the Yokohama Cultural Gymnasium and the major Isezakicho shopping district, with Yokohama Chinatown also within walking distance from the station building itself. The railway station currently serves as a central interchange station area for the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line and the Yokohama Municipal Subway Blue Line.
 
The station was opened from 9 May 1964 as an intermediate station on both the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line and Yokohama Line under the management of the Japanese National Railways (JNR), securely serving as a stopping point for all train services on both lines. From 4 September 1976, it became a main interchange railway terminal stop for the Yokohama Municipal Subway Blue Line, with the station coming under the management of East Japan Railway Company (JR East) on 1 April 1987. As of 1 November 2022, the complex has two elevated side platforms serving two local tracks for the JR lines and two split underground side platforms serving two tracks for the subway lines.
 
Track No. 1 serving the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line & Yokohama Line trains bound for Ofuna at Kannai Station during the early evening rush hours

The overall view of the JR Line station platforms at Kannai Station during the early evening rush hours

The main station transit concourse leading to the platforms at Kannai Station during the early evening rush hours

Crossing the roads of Minato-cho 4-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, shortly after leaving Kannai Station on a bright and clear late summer's early evening

The exterior view of Kannai Station located along Minato-cho 3-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's early evening

Bypassing several restaurants and cafeterias located along Masago-cho 3-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's early evening

Bypassing Gyu-Kaku (Yokohama Kannai Branch) (牛角 横浜関内店), where I previously ate at with my family in December 2015, along Masago-cho 3-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's early evening

About to cross the small street roads of Masago-cho 3-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, past Kannai Station on a bright and clear late summer's early evening

Crossing the roads of Hagoromo-cho 1-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's early evening

Overlooking several downtown infrastructure while crossing the roads of Hagoromo-cho 1-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's early evening

About to cross the small street roads of Masago-cho 3-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, towards the Certe Annex building on a bright and clear late summer's early evenong

Finally stumbling upon Yakitori Akiyoshi (Yokohama Kannai Branch) (やきとりの名門秋吉 横浜関内店) located along Masago-cho 3-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, on a bright and clear late summer's early evening
 
After securely passing through and exploring the local areas of Minato-cho and Masago-cho, Naka-ku, Yokohama, for approximately 15 minutes from Kannai Station, I eventually arrived at a local yakitori restaurant, known as Yakitori Akiyoshi (Yokohama Kannai Branch) (やきとりの名門秋吉 横浜関内店), at 5.30 p.m. sharp. Given that I was feeling quite hungry, I entered the restaurant area and requested for a table for myself. A restaurant waitress then escorted me over to a vacant rear table before securely providing the main menus for me to make my reviews for dinner later on.
 
Once I was ready to eat, a restaurant staff waitress came over to my table to take my major meal orders for dinner. For my main yakitori skewer dishes, I would have one order each of beef tongue and pork belly, with two orders of chicken skin and a single bowl of steamed white rice. I would also have a glass of local highball whiskey to accompany my first independent overseas leisure voyage dinner. This would be a very wise meal order, knowing that I had developed a fondness for Japanese highball whiskey since mid-2022.
 
Upon recording my major orders, the waitress immediately sent them to the restaurant kitchen areas for the chefs to prepare, with my glass of Japanese highball whiskey being the first item to arrive at my table. Soon enough, all my other meal orders began to arrive at my table, with the yakitori skewers placed on the communal metal grill serving plate in the middle of the table. Tucking into both my skewer dishes and white rice, all of the yakitori dishes tasted tender and succulent to my tastes and preferences, with the highball whiskey being the perfect accompaniment for the early evening.
 
The interior view of Yakitori Akiyoshi (Yokohama Kannai Branch) (やきとりの名門秋吉 横浜関内店) from my table shortly after I had settled down

Looking through the main menu of Yakitori Akiyoshi (Yokohama Kannai Branch) (やきとりの名門秋吉 横浜関内店) at my table

A single glass of Japanese highball whiskey for myself at Yakitori Akiyoshi (Yokohama Kannai Branch) (やきとりの名門秋吉 横浜関内店)

A side order of beef tongue yakitori skewers for myself at Yakitori Akiyoshi (Yokohama Kannai Branch) (やきとりの名門秋吉 横浜関内店)

A side order of pork belly yakitori skewers for myself at Yakitori Akiyoshi (Yokohama Kannai Branch) (やきとりの名門秋吉 横浜関内店)

An overall view of my main yakitori skewer meal on my dining table at Yakitori Akiyoshi (Yokohama Kannai Branch) (やきとりの名門秋吉 横浜関内店)

A side order of chicken skin yakitori skewers for myself at Yakitori Akiyoshi (Yokohama Kannai Branch) (やきとりの名門秋吉 横浜関内店)

An additional side order of chicken skin yakitori skewers for myself at Yakitori Akiyoshi (Yokohama Kannai Branch) (やきとりの名門秋吉 横浜関内店)

The interior view of Yakitori Akiyoshi (Yokohama Kannai Branch) (やきとりの名門秋吉 横浜関内店) from my table shortly after I had finished eating
 
After having a sumptuous local yakitori skewer dinner at Yakitori Akiyoshi (Yokohama Kannai Branch) (やきとりの名門秋吉 横浜関内店) located along Masago-cho 3-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, the main restaurant clock was soon showing 6.15 p.m.. Given that there was nothing much left to do for the evening, I immediately decided to directly head back to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama to retire for the night. With that, I promptly paid up my meal check and securely made my way back to Kannai Station, eventually reaching there safely at 6.20 p.m..
 
Proceeding to the automatic JR line ticket vending machines, I purchased a single journey ticket to Sakuragicho Station, knowing that it would be the nearest local JR line station serving the Oakwood Suites Yokohama. Once I had safely passed through the automatic ticketing gates, I quickly went to check the departure time for the nearest Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local train bound for Omiya. According to the departure timetable information board, the closest Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local train bound for Omiya would be expected to depart at precisely 6.35 p.m. sharp from Track No. 2. With that, I promptly took the nearest escalator to Track No. 2 for the trip bound for Sakuragicho, thus reaching the platform at 6.25 p.m..
 
The exterior view of Yakitori Akiyoshi (Yokohama Kannai Branch) (やきとりの名門秋吉 横浜関内店) located along Masago-cho 3-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, as dusk begins to fall over Yokohama

Approaching the JR Line ticketing concourse at Kannai Station during the early evening rush hours

The automated JR Line ticket vending machines in the JR Line ticketing concourse at Kannai Station during the early evening rush hours

Approaching the automated ticketing gates in the JR Line ticketing concourse at Kannai Station during the early evening rush hours

The JR Line transit concourse leading to the station platforms at Kannai Station during the early evening rush hours

Finally arriving at Track No. 2 at Kannai Station during the early evening rush hours

A 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 6.28 p.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Minami-urawa, arriving at Kannai Station on Track No. 2

The overhead departure information panel for Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line & Yokohama Line trains departing from Track No. 2 at Kannai Station indicating that the 6.35 p.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local train service bound for Omiya would be the next train to depart from Track No. 2

The overall view of the JR Line station platforms at Kannai Station as dusk begins to fall over Yokohama

A 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 6.31 p.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Isogo, arriving at Kannai Station on Track No. 1

Track No. 2 at Kannai Station shortly before the 6.35 p.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Omiya arrived at the station
 
After spending almost 10 minutes of anticipated waiting on the main railway platform, a 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 6.35 p.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Omiya, soon arrived at Kannai Station by precisely 6.35 p.m. sharp on Track No. 2. Once the train doors were opened, I promptly boarded the train via Car No. 7 and settled down for the upcoming rapid early evening rush trip duration of two minutes to Sakuragicho Station located in the Sakuragicho district of downtown Naka-ku, Yokohama.
 
Soon enough, within just a few seconds, all of the train doors were securely closed, and the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local train directly pulled out of Kannai Station for the remainder of its long major early evening commuter journey timing of just 2 hours 06 minutes from Ofuna to Omiya via Tokyo. I was then on my way for a short and routine major early evening commuter railroad journey of approximately two minutes over to Sakuragicho Station located in the Sakuragicho district of downtown Naka-ku, Yokohama.
 
A 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 6.35 p.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Omiya, arriving at Kannai Station on Track No. 2

The interior of Car No. 7 on board the 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 6.35 p.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Omiya, during the boarding process on Track No. 2 at Kannai Station

Finally departing Kannai Station

The route guidance information panel above the train doors on board Car No. 7 of the 10-car E233 series EMU, operating as the 6.35 p.m. Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line local service bound for Omiya, indicating that the next station is Sakuragicho

Bypassing several downtown infrastructure in Yoshida-machi, Naka-ku, Yokohama, between Kannai and Sakuragicho Stations

Finally arriving at Sakuragicho Station
 
After a routine early evening commuter rush trip of only two minutes from the Kannai district situated in downtown Naka-ku, Yokohama, I eventually arrived at Sakuragicho Station at 6.37 p.m. on Track No. 4. Grabbing all my belongings, I immediately disembarked from the train and took the closest escalator down to the major JR Line transit concourse prior to inserting my used single JR Line train journey ticket into the automatic JR Line ticketing gates and exiting the station building via the East Entrance at 6.40 p.m..
 
Once I was safely out of the main interchange station building, I knew that I would have to walk across the Kitanaka Bridge to get back to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama in the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot at Kitanaka-dori 5-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama. With that, I immediately passed through the streets of Sakuragicho 1-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, in the direction leading directly over to the Kitanaka Bridge and enjoyed the night sea breeze of Yokohama at the same time. The entire walk to the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot took not more than approximately 10 minutes that evening.
 
Sakuragicho Station (Japanese: 桜木町駅; Korean: 사쿠라기초 역; Traditional Chinese: 櫻木町站; Simplified Chinese: 樱木町站) is an interchange railway station complex by 1 Sakuragicho 1-chome and 34 Hanasaki-cho 1-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan. It is situated closer to the Minato Mirai 21 district and Yokohama Landmark Tower, with the major railroad station providing access to the local Yokohama Air Cabin gondola system connecting directly to and from the Yokohama Cosmo World theme park complex. Operated directly by East Japan Railway Company (JR East) and Yokohama Municipal Subway, the major station serves as an interchange railway terminal complex for the Yokohama Municipal Subway Blue Line, Yokohama Line and Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line.
 
The station was formally opened on 12 June 1872 as the original Yokohama Station when revenue services from Shinagawa commenced, thus making it one of the oldest passenger railroad terminals in Japan. Initially serving the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line and Yokohama Line, the railway station gained its current name on 15 August 1915 when Yokohama Station was relocated twice, especially following the 1923 Great Kanto earthquake. It also served as the western railroad terminus station for the Tokyu Toyoko Line from 31 March 1932 to 30 January 2004, when the line was extended to the Minato Mirai 21 district via the Minatomirai Line.
 
From 4 September 1976, the railway station became an interchange station complex with the Yokohama Municipal Subway Blue Line, with the subway line directly running parallel to the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line, Yokohama Line and the Tokyu Toyoko Line railroad section beyond Yokohama Station until the line sector was closed down on 31 January 2004. It then became a connecting station complex with the Yokohama Air Cabin cable car system from 22 April 2021, thus allowing passengers to access Unga Park. As of 18 March 2023, the railway station has two elevated island platforms housing three tracks for the JR Lines and an underground island platform with just two tracks for the Yokohama Municipal Subway Blue Line.
 
Tracks No. 3 and 4 serving the Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line & Yokohama Line trains bound for Omiya and Hachioji at Sakuragicho Station during the early evening rush hours

The overall view of the JR Line platforms at Sakuragicho Station during the early evening rush hours

Walking through the JR Line transit concourse leading to the station platforms at Sakuragicho Station during the early evening rush hours

Approaching the ticketing gates in the JR Line transit concourse at Sakuragicho Station during the early evening rush hours

Walking through the JR Line ticketing concourse located near the East Entrance at Sakuragicho Station during the early evening rush hours

The East Entrance at Sakuragicho Station during the early evening rush hours shortly after I had exited the JR Line ticketing concourse of the station building

Overlooking the Yokohama Landmark Tower while walking along the streets of Sakuragicho 1-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, shortly after exiting Sakuragicho Station at night

Bypassing several cafeterias near the East Entrance at Sakuragicho Station located along Sakuragicho 1-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, at night

Crossing a pedestrian road crossing along Sakuragicho 1-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, on the way back to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama at night

Crossing the Kitanaka Bridge located along Kitanaka-dori 6-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, while overlooking the Sakuragicho and Minato Mirai 21 business districts at night

Overlooking the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot and Oakwood Suites Yokohama while walking along the streets of Kitanaka-dori 6-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, at night

Overlooking the InterContinental Hotel Yokohama Grand from the Kitanaka Bridge located along Kitanaka-dori 6-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, at night

Overlooking the Minato Mirai 21 business district from the Kitanaka Bridge located along Kitanaka-dori 6-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, at night

Overlooking several downtown infrastructure in the Sakuragicho district from the Kitanaka Bridge located along Kitanaka-dori 6-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, at night

About to cross another pedestrian road crossing along Kitanaka-dori 5-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, near the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot at night

Getting closer to the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot located along Kitanaka-dori 5-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, at night
 
After walking through the busy central streets of Sakuragicho 1-chome and Kitanaka-dori 5-chome, Naka-ku, Yokohama, for approximately 10 minutes from Sakuragicho Station, I arrived at the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot at 6.50 p.m.. Given that I was in need of some groceries for my coming 10-day stay in Yokohama, I decided to stop at a nearby supermarket, known as LINCOS (Yokohama Bashamichi Branch) (リンコス 横浜馬車道店), to get some major beverages before heading back to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama.
 
While I was at LINCOS (Yokohama Bashamichi Branch) (リンコス 横浜馬車道店), I purchased two large bottles of mineral water and one large bottle of Japanese milk tea to ensure that I would be properly hydrated in my Room No. 5023. Upon purchasing my groceries, I departed from the supermarket safely by 6.55 p.m. and went over to the first floor major hotel entrance to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama before riding two sets of express elevators back to my allocated guest Room No. 5023 via the hotel lobby on the 46th floor area. The entire walk back to my Room No. 5023 located on the 50th floor took not more than approximately five minutes.
 
Stopping at LINCOS (Yokohama Bashamichi Branch) (リンコス 横浜馬車道店) to purchase some beverages for myself on the way back to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama at night

Bypassing the Yokohama Kitanaka Knot Entrance at Bashamichi Station in the Kitanaka Brick & White commercial and cultural shopping area at night while getting closer to the first floor entrance to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama

Approaching the main entrance to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama and The Tower Yokohama Kitanaka in the Kitanaka Brick & White commercial and cultural shopping area at night

Finally arriving at the first floor hotel entrance and express elevator lobby to the Oakwood Suites Yokohama at night

Bypassing the observation area in the main hotel lobby located on the 46th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama at night

Making my way to the hotel guest elevator lobby in the main hotel lobby located on the 46th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama at night

Finally arriving back at my assigned Room No. 5023 located on the 50th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama at night

Overlooking the Yokohama Landmark Tower and Minato Mirai 21 business district from my assigned Room No. 5023 located on the 50th floor at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama at night
 
After purchasing my beverages at LINCOS (Yokohama Bashamichi Branch) (リンコス 横浜馬車道店) and taking only two express elevators at the Oakwood Suites Yokohama, I arrived back at my allocated Room No. 5023 on the 50th floor at seven o' clock sharp. Putting my belongings down, I quickly went to have a well-earned shower and changed into my pajamas before placing all my used clothes in the washing machine to be securely washed overnight to prevent myself from contracting COVID-19 during my trip in Japan.
 
Once I had settled in for the night, I placed all my beverage groceries in the refrigerator and set up all my portable electronic gadgets to be charged on the larger desk. Since I would be going on a garden park day journey up to Kanazawa the next day, I quickly knew that it would be best not to stay up too late that night. Upon doing some surfing on my laptop and keeping in touch with my parents to update them of my major welfare, I turned in by around 9.30 p.m. for a well-earned good night's sleep so that I could wake up early the next morning for my day trip to Kanazawa.
 
This officially brings the first section of my maiden independent 10-day late summer getaway vacation to eastern Japan in August and September 2023 to a formal conclusion. As with all other major overseas voyage trip reports on this site, questions and / or comments will be more than welcome in the comment box below. The remaining four main sections of this late summer trip report will be published once I have chosen the highest quality images and videos for them. Please do be patient as this shall require a substantial amount of time and effort to do so.

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