Sunday, August 25, 2013

Winter Holiday in Hokkaido in December 2010 (Enhanced Version) ~ Section 5

Noticing that we had some drinks to finish, we consumed them as they were over 100 ml, which were prohibited beyond the security checkpoint. This was due to liquids, aerosols and gels restrictions, which limits liquid capacities to 100 ml per container in a transparent resealable plastic bag of one litre, with only one bag per traveller.

These restrictions were in force since an attempted aviation terror plot in mid-2006. Japan implemented these restrictions on all departing international flights on 1 March 2007, with violations punishable by law. Failure to comply with these new liquids, aerosols and gels restrictions is considered a serious offence under national law and international civil aviation regulations. This is especially an offence under Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) Regulations.

It is also an offence to try and conceal liquids, aerosols and gels in hand-carry baggage in Japanese airports. Offenders may be liable upon convictiob to a fine of up to ¥500,000, an imprisonment term not exceeding two years, or a combination of both penalties. These are some frequently asked questions:


Liquids, Aerosols and Gels Restrictions (Japan)

Questions and Answers

1) What are the new restrictions and rules?

The new measures apply to the amount of liquids, aerosols and gels passengers can take on their flights in their carry-on baggage.

Under these new restrictions, passengers can take their liquids in containers of up to 100 ml in a transparent, resealable plastic bag with a maximum capacity of 1-litre.

The containers must fit comfortably in the bag, which must be completely closed. Only one bag per person is allowed.

2) Why are these new security measures being implemented?

The security measures are in line with the International Civil Aviation Organisation’s (ICAO) recommendation made after the August 2006 transatlantic aircraft plot.

Though some countries do not experience aviation threats, the August 2006 incident highlights how real transnational terrorism is. Japan strongly supports this recommendation as this will help ensure the safety of their airport users.

3) When were the measures implemented?

The measures were implemented on 1 March 2007.

4) Do the measures apply to both arriving and departing flights?

The measures apply to departing international flights only.

5) What are considered liquids, aerosols and gels?

Such items include, but not limited to:

- Drinks, including water and juices
- Soups and sauces
- Creams
- Perfumes
- Any other items related to the above

6) Can I still purchase duty-free items in the airport?

Yes. However, in case of connecting flights in other countries, liquids purchased in this way may need to be surrendered to the transit airport security personnel in that particular state.

7) Am I able to bring my jams, pastes and creams on board my flight?

You may bring these items on your flight. However, they must be in containers with a maximum capacity of 100 ml in transparent, resealable plastic bag with a capacity of just 1 litre, which must be completely closed.

Any liquids and gels in a container greater than 100 ml (even if partially filled) should be put in your check-in baggage. However, please note that the restrictions on hazardous items still apply.

8) Are empty containers allowed on my flight, even if its capacity is at least 100 ml?

Yes. As long as containers with a capacity exceeding 100 ml are completely empty, they will be allowed through the security checkpoint.

9) What happens to surrendered liquids, aerosols and gels?

All such items are usually disposed of.

10) What will happen if I fail to comply with the measures?

You will not be able to board your flight, unless your liquids, aerosols and gels comply with the new measures. Attempting to conceal liquids, aerosols and gels, or failure to comply with these new restrictions is a criminal offence under national law and international civil aviation regulations.

This is also a criminal offence under Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) regulations. If you deliberately try to conceal your liquids, aerosols and gels, or violate the restrictions in whatever manner, you may be liable to a fine of up to ¥500,000, two years’ imprisonment, or with both penalties. Remember, in many countries, different airports may have different procedures.

11) What if I am connecting to another international flight via transit in Japan?

Passengers are advised that when transiting in Japan, duty-free purchases are restricted to 100 ml or less. These may be packed in your 1-litre transparent, resealable plastic bag.

In other cases, you may have to surrender these items to pass through the transit security checkpoint. You are advised to check with the duty-free personnel at your departure airport if you have a connecting international flight in Japan.

12) What are the special exemptions for liquids, aerosols and gels?

Special exemptions will be made for medication, infant food and special dietary items in liquids, aerosols and gels form. These should be taken in sufficient amounts for your flight, and presented separately to the security officers.

13) For liquid medications, infant food and special dietary items, how do I get these past the security checkpoint?

To get these items past the security checkpoint, you may be asked to taste the items before approval. It is advisable to bring a doctor’s prescription should you have any liquid medications with you.

14) What if the security-screening officer does not accept the amount of liquid medication, infant food and special dietary items I require?

The security-screening personnel have the final decision of what can be brought on board your flight. Take note that some security-screening officers may consider certain liquid medication, infant food and special dietary items exceeding the allowance limit.

Where it is not possible, you may have to surrender these items in order to pass through the checkpoint. Failure to do so may result in the prohibition of boarding your flight. As with all other liquids, aerosols and gels restrictions, failure to comply with these new restrictions is a criminal offence under national Japanese Law and Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) Regulations.

15) A caution about getting angry or aggressive (physically or verbally) at the security personnel after seizure of liquids, aerosols and gels (i.e. Physically assaulting a security-screening officer after he or she has seized my favourite maple syrup).

Blowing your temper or responding aggressively over liquids and gels will most likely result in the situation will be very likely to become worse; not better for you. For example, if you deliberately and physically assault any security screening personnel after he / she has seized your liquids, aerosols and gels, the relevant Japanese airport authorities may reserve the right to take legal action against you. Assaulting any security-screening personnel after they seize your liquids, aerosols and gels is considered an extremely serious offence, since you are endangering the safety of the security personnel at the airport.

Offenders may be liable to a heavy fine and / or a possible imprisonment term, if convicted of the above mentioned offences. The Japanese airport authorities take incidents involving security personnel assaults over any seizure of liquids, aerosols and gels very seriously.

Airlines may also reserve the right to take the following actions against the offender, of which, such actions include, but not limited to:

- Not allowing the person to board his or her flight
- Banning the person from future travel with the airline
- Revocation of the person’s loyalty programme membership with the airline
- Reporting the offender to the relevant authorities
- Assisting any relevant authorities in any investigations and / or the offender’s prosecution

These new security measures are implemented not to make your journey difficult and unpleasant, but to protect you from any potential dangers of any terrorist plots. The use of violence towards security screening staff over liquids, aerosols and gels restrictions under any circumstances is wrong, no matter what the reason is.

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