Saturday, July 13, 2013

Mini-Shopping Holiday in Hong Kong in March 2011 ~ Section 2

Welcome to the second section of my vacation in Hong Kong in March 2011. The topics that will be covered in this part will be mainly Victoria Peak and spending the afternoon on the Airport Express MTR Line and Tung Chung.

Part 1 ~ Victoria Peak


On Saturday (12 March), a day after the dreadful March 11 Tohoku-Pacific Ocean Tsunami in Japan, we woke up at around 10.45 a.m., after a nice, well-earned sleep. Feeling very tired after the journey from Singapore the previous day, my parents went out, buying lunch for us in the midst, while my brother and I stayed in the hotel room to do our own personal stuff.


Before my parents went out, my dad told us that in advance, he made a dinner reservation at Café Deco at The Peak Galleria at Victoria Peak for 8 o' clock later that night. With nothing else to do for the rest of the afternoon, my brother and I simply had the time of our lives in the hotel room.


The overall view of Mong Kok as seen from our hotel room

The view of our hotel room in the late morning hours

Several housing apartments in Mong Kok from our hotel room

A school in Mong Kok with a field in the centre

An East Rail MTR Line (formerly KCR East Rail) train approaching Mong Kok East Station as seen from our hotel room

The East Rail MTR Line tracks and downtown Mong Kok as seen from our room in the Royal Plaza Hotel

After spending the entire afternoon lounging in our room, our parents returned from their shopping at around 5.45 p.m.. Having a refreshing shower and changing into our outing attire, we took the elevator down to the main lobby of the hotel. Once we were in the lobby, we went to the hotel reception counter to arrange for a cab to Victoria Peak.

The view of downtown Mong Kok during sunset

The main lobby of the Royal Plaza Hotel Hong Kong during the evening hours

At around 6.50 p.m., a red Hong Kong taxi pulled up at the main entrance to the Royal Plaza Hotel Hong Kong. The hotel porter then gave instructions to the driver on how to take us to Victoria Peak. Soon, we were on our way for a journey time of 25 minutes towards Victoria Peak located on Hong Kong Island via the Cross-Harbour Tunnel.


Victoria Peak (Chinese: 太平山), most commonly known as The Peak, is one of the mountains in Hong Kong. It is quite popular among both foreigners and locals as it offers spectacular views over Central, Victoria Harbour, and the surrounding islands. This makes it one of our favourite landmarks in Hong Kong.

The Peak is easily accessible via The Peak Tram, which links between Garden Road Station at the base, and The Peak, located at the summit. Two shopping centers, which are The Peak Galleria and Peak Tower, are available to cater to the people's shopping needs. Usually, the best time to visit The Peak would be at night, as the night views of Hong Kong are extremely spectacular and breathtaking.


Driving along Nathan Road from the Royal Plaza Hotel Hong Kong

Approaching the Cross-Harbour Tunnel between Kowloon and Hong Kong Island

Finally arriving on Hong Kong Island from the Cross-Harbour Tunnel

Kowloon as seen from the flyover from the Cross-Harbour Tunnel

Bypassing several tall buildings on Hong Kong Island

Bypassing the Bank of China Tower Hong Kong

Bypassing several office buildings on a flyover road towards Victoria Peak

Driving along a road flyover bridge that leads to Victoria Peak

Bypassing several housing condominiums while starting to climb up the steep hill to Victoria Peak

The view of Hong Kong Island as we climb upwards to Victoria Peak

Bypassing a petrol station along the hillside road towards Victoria Peak

Climbing up the dimly-lit mountain road towards Victoria Peak

Several houses at Victoria Peak at night

Bypassing a bus stop on the way up to The Peak Galleria at Victoria Peak

Passing by some shops along the Victoria Peak roadway

Finally approaching The Peak Galleria at Victoria Peak

After a journey time of 25 minutes from the Royal Plaza Hotel Hong Kong, we finally arrived at the main taxi stand of The Peak Galleria at Victoria Peak at 7.20 p.m.. Upon payment of our taxi fare to the taxi driver, we went up into the main shopping mall of The Peak Galleria.

There, while my parents and younger brother did a bit of shopping, I went to the Häagen-Dazs ice cream parlour for some chocolate cookie ice cream. My parents met up with me there a few moments later.

We also visited The Peak Tower, which was located adjacent to The Peak Galleria and had a video arcade above it, in order to search for some new footwear.

The taxi stands at The Peak Galleria

The entrance to The Peak Galleria from the taxi stands

The overall interior of The Peak Galleria

A 7-Eleven convenience shop located near one of the main entrances to The Peak Galleria

The Peak Tower as seen from the main entrance to The Peak Galleria

The logo of Häagen-Dazs ice cream parlour at The Peak Galleria

The main entrance to The Peak Galleria

The interior of the Häagen-Dazs ice cream parlour at The Peak Galleria

The lining up counter in the Häagen-Dazs ice cream parlour at The Peak Galleria

A cup of chocolate cookie chip ice cream for myself in the Häagen-Dazs ice cream parlour at The Peak Galleria

The exterior view of The Peak Galleria at night

The exterior view of The Peak Tower at night

The visitor information centre near The Peak Galleria on Victoria Peak

The Häagen-Dazs ice cream parlour by the main entrance to The Peak Galleria

A preserved green-liveried Peak Tram now used as a visitor information booth

The entrance to The Peak Tower

Passing by a small cafeteria by the entrance to The Peak Tower

Walking past several shops in The Peak Tower

The escalators towards the upper floors in The Peak Tower

My younger brother testing out a pair of yellow boots, which makes him look like Phua Chu Kang, a character played by the famous Singaporean actor Gurmit Singh in the comical and popular Singaporean sitcom TV series Phua Chu Kang

The interior of a Crocs footwear shop in The Peak Tower

After shopping around Victoria Peak for approximately half an hour, it was time to head to Café Deco at The Peak Galleria. Upon arrival at the main entrance of Café Deco at 7.55 p.m., we went to check our table reservations to see whether they were valid.


A waitress then came to the reservations counter to check whether our names were on the reservation list. With our names on the list, she directed us to a table on the upper level of the restaurant. With the food and beverage menus now in our hands, we made a review through the menus to see what dishes could be of interest to us.

The upper entrance to Café Deco at The Peak Galleria

The logo of Café Deco at The Peak Galleria by the main entrance

The upper interior level of Café Deco at The Peak Galleria

The Peak Tower above the Peak Tram Station from the upper level of Café Deco at The Peak Galleria

The scenic night view of Hong Kong from the upper level of Café Deco at The Peak Galleria

Some of the many oysters at an oyster bar in the upper level of Café Deco at The Peak Galleria

The lower level interior of Café Deco at The Peak Galleria

Some of the chefs cooking in the galley at the lower level of Café Deco at The Peak Galleria

Many passengers rolling up at the Peak Tram Station to board the Peak Tram down towards downtown Hong Kong

The scenic night view of Hong Kong from the lower level of Café Deco at The Peak Galleria

The cover page for the food and beverage menu of Café Deco at The Peak Galleria

Looking through the food and beverage menu of Café Deco at The Peak Galleria

After having a good review through the food and beverage menus, a waiter finally came to our table to take down our dinner orders. We ordered several main dishes and sides that might be to our likings. This included some of the delicious oysters which were served from the oyster bar.

Soon, that night, we had a huge feast at Café Deco at The Peak Galleria. As always, service and food at Café Deco at The Peak Galleria was top-notch.

A glass of orange juice for myself

My parents posing for a picture in Café Deco

A sushi roll on a stand for my parents to share

Our first platter of oysters and clam

A cone of french fries and chicken nuggets on a stand with sauces

A glass of water and orange juice for myself

Our second platter of oysters and clam

A large cheese and salami pizza to be shared among us

A plate of grilled rib-eye steak

Feasting through my sumptuous main dinner course

The upper level of Café Deco during dinnertime

The beautiful and scenic view of Hong Kong from Victoria Peak at Café Deco at night

The Peak Tower and the Peak Tram Station still packed with passengers

The view of the Bank of China Tower Hong Kong from Victoria Peak at night

The upper level of Café Deco just before we finished dinner

After having a large and sumptuous dinner feast at Café Deco at The Peak Galleria, it was already 9.20 p.m.. Feeling pretty worn out after spending the evening at Victoria Peak, we decided to head back to the Royal Plaza Hotel Hong Kong. With that, we paid up our dinner bill, and went down towards the first floor of The Peak Galleria.

Realising that the Peak Tram station was still packed with waiting passengers, we were left with no choice but to get a taxi back to our hotel. Without any more hesitations, we went down to the taxi stand below the mall.

The top floor of The Peak Galleria with some closed shops

Riding down the escalator towards the second floor

A display of flowers by the main entrance to The Peak Galleria

Several outdoor concourses at Victoria Peak between The Peak Galleria and The Peak Tower at night

Many people crowding outside The Peak Galleria at night

The exterior view of The Peak Galleria just before we hailed a taxi back to the Royal Plaza Hotel Hong Kong

As soon as we were in at the taxi stand below The Peak Galleria at 9.30 p.m., we rolled up for a taxi towards the Royal Plaza Hotel Hong Kong. Once our turn to call for a taxi came, we flagged the nearest one down and showed the driver the hotel card. Soon, by 9.35 p.m., we were on our way back for a short 30-minute journey towards the Royal Plaza Hotel Hong Kong, located in Mong Kok in Kowloon.

Starting our travel down towards downtown Hong Kong from Victoria Peak

Bypassing some shop buildings near The Peak Galleria at Victoria Peak

Bypassing a bus stop along the road from Victoria Peak to Central Hong Kong

Climbing down the dimly-lit hillside road from Victoria Peak to Central Hong Kong

The Bank of China Tower Hong Kong as we climb down the dimly-lit hillside road from Victoria Peak to Central Hong Kong

Bypassing a luxury condominium near the road upwards to Victoria Peak

Reaching the base of the mountain road from Victoria Peak

The junctions of a busy road near the Bank of China Tower Hong Kong at night

Bypassing the Bank of China Tower Hong Kong again while heading towards Kowloon

Driving along the roads of Central Hong Kong during the late night hours

Taking the expressway towards the Cross-Harbour Tunnel in Central Hong Kong

About to enter the busy and crowded Cross-Harbour Tunnel

Approaching the toll gate in Kowloon from the Cross-Harbour Tunnel

Bypassing some housing apartments near Mong Kok

Passing by more housing apartments near Mong Kok and Prince Edward

After a rapid 30-minute taxi ride from Victoria Peak, we finally arrived back at the Royal Plaza Hotel Hong Kong at 10.05 p.m.. Upon paying our taxi fares, we went into the hotel at 10.15 p.m., and took the elevator back up to our hotel room.

As soon as we were back in our hotel room, we had a shower and changed up into our night clothings before settling down to do anything else.



The main lobby of the Royal Plaza Hotel Hong Kong during the late night hours

The view of our hotel living room shortly after we returned

The view of our hotel living room during late night

After doing our own personal stuff with our own electronic devices, the clock was already showing 11.45 p.m.. Feeling very tired after spending the evening at Victoria Peak, we headed to bed early, as we would have another busy day ahead of us the next day.


Part 2 ~ Airport Express (MTR) Line and Tung Chung

The next day, which was Sunday (13 March), we all woke up at around 9.45 a.m. after a well-earned good night's sleep. According to my parents, we were to travel to Ngong Ping Village, near Tung Chung to pay respects to the Giant Tian Tan Buddha.

After preparing all our necessary belongings for the day, we left the room at 11.15 a.m., and headed down to the main lobby to arrange for a cab to the Langham Place in Mong Kok. Before we did that, we went to see what was in Grand Century Plaza.

The view of downtown Mong Kok during early afternoon

A lineup of shops in the Grand Century Plaza

The main lobby of the Royal Plaza Hotel Hong Kong during the early afternoon hours

As soon as we were in the main hotel lobby, we went to the concierge counter to arrange for a cab to take us to Langham Place in Mong Kok. With the arrangement for the cab, a red Hong Kong taxi pulled up to the main entrance to our hotel at 11.25 a.m.. The hotel porter then told the taxi driver our intended destination. By 11.30 a.m., we were on our way for a short five-minute taxi ride towards Langham Place.

Upon arrival at the Langham Place at 11.35 a.m., we paid the taxi fare and went into the mall. There, we took the escalator all the way to the fourth floor of the mall.

Taking the escalators up to the fourth floor of Langham Place

The Langham Place Hotel Hong Kong as seen from the fourth floor at Langham Place, where we previously stayed at in December 2005 and August 2008. This was the very first hotel we have ever stayed at in Hong Kong

The long escalators leading to the upper floors of Langham Place

After we had reached the fourth floor of the Langham Place, we managed to stumble upon a Chinese noodle house called Chee Kei. Upon arrival at the cafeteria, we requested a table for the four of us and were distributed with the food and beverage menus to decided on our lunch orders.

Arriving at Chee Kei noodle house in Langham Place

The logo of Chee Kei noodle house in Langham Place

The cover page of the food and beverage menu of Chee Kei noodle house in Langham Place

Looking through the food and beverage menu of Chee Kei noodle house in Langham Place

A bowl of papaya soup at the cafeteria

My dad reaching out to get some pieces of steamed wonton

A bowl of braised beef noodle soup for myself

A platter of fried wontons to be shared among us

A shredded pork noodle soup for my brother

A bowl of porridge for my dad

Another bowl of porridge for my mum

The food courts in Langham Place

After finishing lunch at Chee Kei noodle house, the clock was finally showing 12.20 p.m.. Knowing that we were to head towards Tung Chung very soon, we paid up our bill and decided to head down towards Mong Kok MTR Station. With that, we walked down the escalators towards the main entrance, where we came from and went into Mong Kok MTR Station.

My itinerary for the day was to treat myself to an afternoon Airport Express run to and from AsiaWorld-Expo. From AsiaWorld-Expo, I would remain on board the Airport Express train until Tsing Yi. Upon arrival at Tsing Yi StationI would make a train connection for the Tung Chung Line towards Tung Chung, where I would meet my parents at Citygate Outlets. Of courseI would have to take the Tsuen Wan MTR Line to Central Hong Kong first.

For my parents and younger brother, they would take the Tsuen Wan MTR Line directly towards Lai King. Upon arriving at Lai King Station, they would make a crossover change to the Tung Chung Line towards Tung Chung.

Gazing up at the escalators leading towards the upper floors of Langham Place on the fourth floor

Riding down the long escalator towards the main entrance of Langham Place Mong Kok

A busy pedestrian crossing near Langham Place in the early afternoon

Many pedestrians crowding outside the entrance towards Mong Kok MTR Station

One of the entrances towards Mong Kok MTR Station

Walking along the crowded station concourse of Mong Kok Station

As soon as we were in the station concourse of Mong Kok Station by 12.40 p.m., we went to a nearby customer service counter to top up our Octopus Cards. As soon as we had our Octopus Cards topped up, my parents went towards the platforms towards Tsuen Wan, while I went down to the platform towards Central Hong Kong.

Once I was on the Tsuen Wan Line platform towards Central Hong Kong, I waited for a train bound for Central Hong Kong. As Sunday is a busy travel day for many, there were quite a lot of commuters crowding the platforms.

The Kwun Tong Line and Tsuen Wan Line platforms towards Tiu Keng Leng and Tsuen Wan in Mongkok Station

The Tsuen Wan Line route map towards Central Hong Kong

The Kwun Tong Line and Tsuen Wan Line platforms towards Central and Yau Ma Tei in Mongkok Station

After a few moments of waiting on the platform towards Central Hong Kong, a Tsuen Wan Line M-Train bound for Central finally arrived at 12.49 p.m.. Without wasting anymore time, I boarded the train for the short 10-minute hop towards Central. Soon, at 12.50 p.m., the train left Mong Kok Station for its remaining sector towards Central Hong Kong.

The interior of the Tsuen Wan Line M-Train bound for Central Hong Kong

The Tsuen Wan Line route map in the Tsuen Wan Line M-Train bound Central Hong Kong

After approximately 10 minutes of riding on the Tsuen Wan Line from Mong Kok, I finally arrived at the Central terminal station at 1 o' clock. Knowing that there was little time left, I decided to catch the 1.12 p.m. (13 12) Airport Express train bound for AsiaWorld-Expo, as it was the closest timing to leave. With that, I left the Tsuen Wan Line platforms, took the escalators up, and walked along the passageway between Central and Hong Kong Stations towards the Airport Express platforms via the Tung Chung Line concourse.


The Airport Express (Traditional Chinese: 機場快綫; Simplified Chinese: 机场快线) is one of the Mass Transit Railway (MTR) lines serving Hong Kong. It mainly links the major urban districts of Hong Kong to Hong Kong International Airport, and the AsiaWorld-Expo exhibition and convention centre.


Despite being part of the MTR system, the Airport Express is NOT a traditional rapid transit line. Instead, it is a dedicated express rail service to and from the Hong Kong International Airport and AsiaWorld-Expo. Prior to the start of the revised timetable on 15 January 2012, the service frequency for the Airport Express was every 12 minutes in each direction.


The Airport Express line currently uses 11 8-car A-Stock train sets, manufactured by Adtranz and CAF in Spain. The first 7 cars have 2 doors on each side, and Car No. 8 (K Car) functions as the baggage container car. They appear to be very similar to the A-Stock trains used on the more conventional and commuter Tung Chung Line. However, the only difference is that the trains look more like luxury express trains than normal commuter trains. A typical configuration would be E100-F100-G100-H200-F200-G200-J400-K400.


Passengers travelling on the Airport Express can use the in-town check-in service for flights for selected airlines and receive boarding passes for their flights at Hong Kong and Kowloon Stations, without extra costs. There are also free shuttle buses available, which mainly travel to major hotels in Kowloon and Hong Kong.


Because of the relatively high fares and small catchment areas on the Airport Express, some travellers may opt to take the cheaper, local Tung Chung Line, combined with a bus or taxi route to reach their desired destinations whenever possible. They may also use other methods of transport to reach their destinations. The Octopus Card can also be used on the Airport Express.

If you are visiting Hong Kong for the first time and wish to use the Airport Express to access your hotel, you can purchase an Octopus Card from the MTR Customer Service Centre at the airport instead of purchasing a ticket. However, you should purchase your Octopus Card for a sufficient amount (i.e. HK$1000), if you are planning to use the MTR lines in during your stay in Hong Kong. However, if you have already purchased an Octopus Card, and wish to use the Airport Express to access your hotel, it is recommended that you top up your Octopus Card first if the remaining value is insufficient prior to boarding your train.


The Airport Express is also my most favourite MTR line in Hong Kong. It is very comfortable, quiet, and not so crowded (except during rush hours). Hanging out on this MTR line also helps to relieve my mind of certain things. I usually go for a maximum of three rounds each day I use it when on vacation in Hong Kong. For every second round, I would stop at the airport for a brief lunch, drink, bathroom, and commercial aviation model shopping break.


On the Airport Express, I usually like to film videos on the sectors mostly between Tsing Yi Station and Hong Kong International Airport. Of the 8-car configuration, I mainly find seats in Car No. 1 for the journey towards AsiaWorld-Expo end, and the car seating patterns vary on the return trip to Central Hong Kong.


The Tsuen Wan Line station platforms of Central Station

The sign in Central Station that shows the way to the Airport Express trains via Hong Kong Station

The passageway between Central and Hong Kong Stations

The Tung Chung Line concourse of Hong Kong Station

The elevator towards the Airport Express trains in the Tung Chung Line concourse of Hong Kong Station

After walking along the passageway from Central Hong Kong Station, I was finally in the Tung Chung Line concourse at 1.05 p.m.. Knowing that there was an elevator towards the Airport Express trains, I took the elevator just one more floor up and was finally in the Airport Express concourse within a few minutes.


From my instincts, I knew that I was just in time to catch the Airport Express train bound for AsiaWorld-Expo, which would depart from Hong Kong Station at 1.12 p.m. (13 12). Once I passed through the ticket gates, I immediately boarded the train and found a good seat in Car No. 1 (E108) for the 28-minute journey towards AsiaWorld-Expo.

Boarding the 1.12 p.m. (13 12) Airport Express train bound for AsiaWorld-Expo

The interior of Car No. 1 (E108) of the 1.12 p.m. (13 12) Airport Express train bound for AsiaWorld-Expo

Two pairs of seats in Car No. 1 (E108) of the 1.12 p.m. (13 12) Airport Express train bound for AsiaWorld-Expo

At exactly 1.12 p.m., all the automatic train doors closed up and the Airport Express train bound for AsiaWorld-Expo via Hong Kong International Airport pulled out of Hong Kong Station for its 28-minute journey. These are some pictures and videos I took during the 28-minute journey towards AsiaWorld-Expo.

The route indication map of the Airport Express train in Car No. 1 (E108)

The interior of Car No. 1 (E108) of the Airport Express train between Hong Kong and Kowloon

Pulling into Kowloon Station

The empty baggage rack in Car No. 1 (E108) of the Airport Express train bound for AsiaWorld-Expo while stopping briefly at Kowloon Station

機場快綫 (E108) 行走片段 九龍至南昌 (KOW TO NAC)

Passing through Lai King Station

Crossing the Rambler Channel as the train approaches Tsing Yi Station

Crossing the Tsing Ma Bridge while heading towards Hong Kong International Airport and AsiaWorld-Expo

The baggage rack in Car No. 1 (E108) of the Airport Express train bound for AsiaWorld-Expo while crossing the Tsing Ma Bridge

機場快綫 (E108) 行走片段 駛經港鐵欣澳站

The baggage rack in Car No. 1 (E108) of the Airport Express train bound for AsiaWorld-Expo while passing the Siu Ho Wan Depot

The flyover track heading towards Tung Chung New Town for Tung Chung Line trains towards Tung Chung

Bypassing the roads towards Tung Chung and Central Hong Kong while nearing Hong Kong International Airport

Crossing the bridge between Tung Chung New Town and Hong Kong International Airport

Approaching Hong Kong International Airport

The interior of Car No. 1 (E108) of the Airport Express train towards AsiaWorld-Expo while stopping at Hong Kong International Airport Station

The South China Sea as seen from the Airport Express train towards AsiaWorld-Expo

The commercial screen on the Airport Express train indicating that the train is approaching the AsiaWorld-Expo terminal station

After a fast 28-minute Airport Express journey from Central Hong Kong, I finally arrived at the AsiaWorld-Expo terminal station at 1.40 p.m. (13 40). As the Airport Express train would be due to depart from AsiaWorld-Expo at 1.48 p.m. (13 48), I decided to do a carriage changeover to Car No. 7 (J408) for the train's return journey towards Central Hong Kong. I was to terminate at Tsing Yi Station as earlier, I had promised to meet up with my parents at Citygate Outlets in Tung Chung.


The sole Airport Express station platform of AsiaWorld-Expo Station

The interior of Car No. 7 (J408) of the 1.48 p.m. (13 48) Airport Express train towards Central Hong Kong

After approximately eight minutes of waiting, the Airport Express train bound for Central Hong Kong finally pulled out of AsiaWorld-Expo Station at 1.48 p.m. (13 48), as planned. I was then on my way for a journey time of just 18 minutes towards Tsing Yi Station. Here are some pictures and videos taken during the journey between AsiaWorld-Expo and Tsing Yi.


The baggage rack in Car No. 7 (J408) of the Airport Express train bound for Central Hong Kong just prior to leaving AsiaWorld-Expo Station

機場快綫 (J408) 行走片段 博覽館至機場 (AWE TO AIR)

Stopping briefly at Hong Kong International Airport Station on Track No. 2

The route indication map of the Airport Express train in Car No. 7 (J408)

About to depart Hong Kong International Airport Station

An expressway towards Tung Chung New Town and Central Hong Kong as seen from the Airport Express

The Tung Chung Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car station as seen from the Airport Express train bound for Central Hong Kong

About to cross underneath Citygate Outlets Tung Chung

The South China Sea by the Airport Express and Tung Chung Line railway tracks

Travelling parallel to the expressway towards Central Hong Kong

機場快綫 (J408) 行走片段 駛經港鐵欣澳站

The Lantau Airport Railway tracks towards Sunny Bay, Tung Chung and the airport

Crossing the Tsing Ma Bridge towards Tsing Yi on the Airport Express

Approaching Tsing Yi Station

After a short 18-minute Airport Express journey from AsiaWorld-Expo, I finally arrived at my terminal stop, Tsing Yi, at 2.06 p.m. (14 06) on Track No. 2. Upon alighting the train, I filmed a video of the train's departure (sorry I didn't upload it onto YouTube) and exited through the ticket gates towards the concourse.

Upon entering the Airport Express concourse, I took the elevator down to the main floor and changed elevators towards the Tung Chung Line concourse of Tsing Yi Station. From the Tung Chung Line concourse, I took the elevator all the way up to Track No. 3, the Tung Chung Line platform towards Tung Chung.

Tsing Yi Station is an MTR station located on Tsing Yi Island in Hong Kong. It serves as an interchange station for the Airport Express and Tung Chung Line. The station platforms are located on the second and fourth floors of the station (Tracks No. 1 and 3 towards Tung Chung and Hong Kong International Airport on floor U4; Tracks No. 2 and 4 towards Hong Kong on floor U2).

On the second floor, Track No. 2 of the Airport Express Line is only used for passengers coming from AsiaWorld-Expo or Hong Kong International Airport to alight at the station. Track No. 2 is also used for boarding only when Morning Express services are available between Tsing Yi and Central Hong Kong from 7 o' clock to 10 o' clock in the morning (does not run on Sundays and public holidays).

The Hong Kong-bound Airport Express platform of Tsing Yi Station

機場快綫 A-Train (K408-E108) 駛離港鐵青衣站二號月台

The Hong Kong-bound Airport Express concourse of Tsing Yi Station

The Disneyland Resort Line and Tung Chung-bound Tung Chung Line platform of Tsing Yi Station

The elevator for the Airport Express trains in the Disneyland Resort Line and Tung Chung-bound Tung Chung Line platform of Tsing Yi Station

An 8-car Tung Chung Line K-Train bound for Tung Chung finally enters Tsing Yi Station on Track No. 3

After approximately five minutes of waiting on the platform, an 8-car Tung Chung Line K-Train bound for Tung Chung finally arrived at Tsing Yi Station at 2.20 p.m. on Track No. 3. Immediately, I boarded the last car (Car No. 8) and was ready to head to Citygate Outlets in Tung Chung to meet my parents. Once the train pulled out of Tsing Yi Station at 2.21 p.m. (14 21), I was on my way for a rapid 14-minute journey towards Tung Chung.

The Tung Chung Line route map in the Tung Chung Line K-Train bound for Tung Chung

The interior of the Tung Chung Line K-Train bound for Tung Chung

The shore of Yam O as the train approaches Sunny Bay Station

Stopping briefly at Sunny Bay Station

The view of the seashore line near Sunny Bay Station

The view of Yam O after leaving Sunny Bay Station

After a quick 14-minute journey from Tsing Yi, I finally arrived at the Tung Chung terminal station at 2.35 p.m. (14 35). With that, I alighted the train and went up to the main station concourse of the station. Upon exiting the station, I met up with my family at the Häagen-Dazs ice cream parlour, where they were resting.

Once they met me there, we decided to have tea before heading to the Po Lin Monastery to see the Giant Tian Tan Buddha. We then headed to a small restaurant near the entrance to Tung Chung Station called The Spaghetti House. Once there, we requested for a table for the four of us and with the menus provided, we decided to look through before placing our tea orders.

The station platform of Tung Chung Station with lots of passengers

The main station concourse of Tung Chung Station

The view of Citygate Outlets after exiting Tung Chung Station

The entrance to Tung Chung Station

A luxury housing condominium by Citygate Outlets in Tung Chung New Town

The cover page for the food and beverage menu at The Spaghetti House in Citygate Outlets Tung Chung

The interior of The Spaghetti House in Citygate Outlets Tung Chung

After looking through the food and beverage menus of The Spaghetti House, a waiter finally came to our table to take our light meal orders. We ordered some stuff that seemed to be that of our likings. Soon, we had a filling tea at The Spaghetti House at Citygate Outlets Tung Chung. 

A platter of french fries to be shared among us

A can and glass of Coca-cola Light for myself

Several fried items on a platter for us to share

A platter of buffalo wings to be shared among us

The interior of The Spaghetti House in Citygate Outlets Tung Chung after finishing our tea

After having tea at The Spaghetti House, the clock was finally showing 3.35 p.m.. Wanting to catch the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car towards Ngong Ping, we paid the bill and left the restaurant for Tung Chung Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car Station. Between Citygate Outlets and Tung Chung Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car Station, the walk took approximately just five minutes.

The main entrance to Tung Chung MTR Station in the late afternoon

The exterior view of Tung Chung Station

The escalators to the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car at Tung Chung Cable Car Station

After a short five-minute walk from Citygate Outlets, we were finally at Tung Chung Cable Car Station at 3.40 p.m.. With that, we walked up the escalator towards the cable car ticket office and purchased four one-way tickets towards Ngong Ping Village.

The ticketing area of Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car at Tung Chung cable car station

The bridge between Tung Chung and Hong Kong International Airport from the Tung Chung Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car Station

Finally boarding the Ngong Ping Cable Car 360 towards Ngong Ping Village

After we had finished purchasing our cable car tickets for the Ngong Ping Cable Car 360 to Ngong Ping Village, we went over to the cable car platform, where lots of cable car cabins were lining up to transport the passengers all the way up to Ngong Ping village.

Once our turn to board the cable car came, we boarded the cable car and sat in the cabin, leaving Tung Chung Cable Car Station towards the mountain village of Ngong Ping at 3.55 p.m.. The cable car journey between Tung Chung and Ngong Ping took approximately 20 minutes. The view from the Cable Car was very beautiful, allowing us to see Hong Kong International Airport on the way.

The view of Tung Chung New Town as seen from the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car towards Ngong Ping

The view of Tung Chung Bay from the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car

The view of Tung Chung New Town and Tung Chung Bay from the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car

The view of the road between Tung Chung New Town and the airport island

A power station located near Hong Kong International Airport

The first view of Hong Kong International Airport as seen from the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car

My mum and younger brother posing for a picture in the cable car

The view of Hong Kong International Airport as we climb up the mountain towards Ngong Ping in the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car

The first sight of the Giant Tian Tan Buddha in the mountain village of Ngong Ping as seen from the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car

The view of the Giant Tian Tan Buddha in the mountain village of Ngong Ping as seen from the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car

After a short 20-minute cable car ride on the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car, we finally arrived at the Ngong Ping Village Cable Car Station at 4.15 p.m.. Upon exiting from the cable car, we walked past several shops in the cable car station and found ourselves in a small shopping street selling lots of crafty articles as well as little cafeterias and restaurants.

Upon walking through the streets of small local shops, cafeterias and temples, we finally arrived at the Po Lin Monastery close to the Giant Tian Tan Buddha at 4.35 p.m.. There, we spent approximately close to an hour paying respects at the temples at the Giant Tian Tan Buddha and the Po Lin Monastery.

The cable car exit platform at Ngong Ping Cable Car Station

The boarding area of Ngong Ping Village Station at the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car

The little shopping street by Ngong Ping Cable Car Station

Walking through the little shopping street by Ngong Ping Cable Car Station

The first view of the Giant Tian Tan Buddha from the little shopping street by Ngong Ping Cable Car Station

Some little shophouses near the Giant Tian Tan Buddha in Ngong Ping Village

The entrance towards the Po Lin Monastery by the Giant Tian Tan Buddha

Several flags at the base of the stairway towards the Giant Tian Tan Buddha

A large temple in the Po Lin Monastery with some people going up to pay spiritual respects

A flower arena outside the temple in Po Lin Monastery

Several incense stands outside the Po Lin Monastery in Ngong Ping Village

The Ngong Ping roundabout near the Giant Tian Tan Buddha and Po Lin Monastery in the early evening

After spending almost an hour paying spiritual respects at the Giant Tian Tan Buddha and Po Lin Monastery at Ngong Ping Village, the clock was finally showing 5.20 p.m.. Without anything else left to do, we decided to head back to Tung Chung New Town. However, the problem was that by this time, the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car was packed with passengers.

So we were left with no alternatives but to take a coach bus all the way down towards Tung Chung New Town. With that, we went to the nearest bus stop at the Giant Tian Tan Buddha and caught the nearest bus bound for Tung Chung New Town. By 5.30 p.m., we finally raced out of Ngong Ping Village for a 35-minute bus ride over the mountain roads towards Tung Chung New Town, with the ride being relatively bumpy along the way.

The interior of the bus between Ngong Ping Village and Tung Chung New Town

The mountains near Ngong Ping Village as seen from the bus towards Tung Chung New Town

Crossing the lake towards Tung Chung New Town from Ngong Ping

Climbing up the hill towards Tung Chung New Town while viewing the South China Sea from the bus

The view of the South China Sea from the bus between Ngong Ping Village and Tung Chung New Town

Finally arriving back at Tung Chung New Town

After a relatively bumpy 35-minute bus ride from Ngong Ping Village, we finally arrived back at Tung Chung New Town at 6.05 p.m.. Feeling that there was still much more to do around the Mong Kok area, we decided to head to the district immediately.


Our first itinerary would be to take the Tung Chung Line from Tung Chung towards Lai King Station. Upon arrival at Lai King Station, we would make a cross-platform interchange to the Tsuen Wan Line bound for Central towards Mong Kok.


With that, we left the bus interchange and went to Tung Chung MTR Station to catch the nearest train towards Lai King. As soon as we were on the platform, an 8-car Tung Chung Line K-Train was awaiting departure from Track No. 2. With that, we immediately boarded the train in preparation for the short 15-minute journey towards Lai King.


The station concourse of Tung Chung Station in the early evening hours

The station platform of Tung Chung Station

The interior of the Tung Chung Line K-Stock train bound for Central Hong Kong while waiting for departure

While shopping at Harmony Models Hobby Shop at Kwong Wa Street, I managed to buy just one Lufthansa Boeing 747 Herpa Wings Scale 1:500 aircraft model for HK$390 (S$78). The details were as follows:


1) Lufthansa Boeing 747-430 "Hannover Expo 2000" Herpa Scale 1:500 (512015)


Lufthansa Boeing 747-430 "Hannover Expo 2000" Herpa Scale 1:500 (512015)

This now brings the second section of my vacation in Hong Kong in March 2011. All the other sections will be published as soon as the best quality pictures and videos have been selected.

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